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General Daniel I. Sultan - History

General Daniel I. Sultan - History


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General Daniel I. Sultan

General Daniel I. Sultan

A former name retained. Daniel Isom Sultan, born 9 December 1885 at Oxford, Miss., graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1907 and was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. Prior to World War I, he served in the Philippine Islands and was in charge of the construction of fortifications on Corregidor. In 1918 he was assigned to the War Department General Staff in France. From 1929 to 1931, he commanded troops during a survey of the proposed Inter-Ocean Canal route through Nicaragua; and, from 1934 to 1938, he presided as Commissioner of the District of Columbia. Promoted to Brigadier General 8 July 1939, he was in command of the 38th Infantry Division at the beginning of World War II. Following his command of the VIII Corps, he was ordered to the China-Burma-India Theater in 1943 to act as Deputy Commander under General Joseph Stilwell. He was promoted to Lieutenant General 2 September 1944 and on 24 October became Commander of the Burma-India

Theater. Returning to the United States 23 June 1945, he was appointed Inspector General of the Army 14 July. General Sultan died 14 January 1947 at Washington, D.C., while on active duty.

Admiral W. S. Benson (AP-120) (q.v.) was reacquired by the Navy from the Army Transport Service as General Daniel I. Sultan 1 March 1950 and assigned to MSTS. Manned by a civilian crew, she operated in the Pacific out of San Francisco. From 1950 to 1953 she steamed to the Western Pacific in support of the effort to repel Communist aggression in Korea. She made more than 20 round-trip voyages to the Far East and carried men and supplies to American bases in Japan, Okinawa, Guam, Formosa and the Philippine Islands. Following the end of hostilities in Korea, she continued supply and trooplift runs to the troubled Far East. During the next 13 years, she completed more than 100 deployments to the Western Pacific while supporting peace-keeping operations by American forces.

In response to America's determination to defend the independence and integrity of South Vietnam from external Communist aggression, General Daniel I. Sultan departed San Francisco for Southeast Asia 2 August 1965. Steaming via Japan, she embarked troops at Okinawn and reached Da Nang, South Vietnam, 28 August. She returned to San Francisco 11 September and during the remainder of 1966 completed two more round-trip voyages to Qui Nhon and Vung Tau, South Vietnam. In the first 7 months of 1966 she made four runs to Japan, Okinawa, Taiwan, and the Philippines. She operated in the Western Pacific, supporting the forces of freedom in the Far East, until arriving San Francisco late in December 1966. Early in 1967 she was placed in ready reserve status.

General Daniel I. Sultan received two battle stars for Korean war service.


Records of U.S. Army Forces in the China-Burma-India Theaters of Operations

Related Records:
Records of U.S. Army Service Forces (World War II), RG 160.
Records of Naval Operating Forces, RG 313.
Records of the Army Staff, RG 319.
Records of Allied Operational and Occupation Headquarters, World War II, RG 331.
Records of U.S. Theaters of War, World War II, RG 332.
Records of Interservice Agencies, RG 334.
Records of U.S. Army Operational, Tactical, and Support Organizations (World War II and Thereafter), RG 338.
Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations, RG 342.

493.2 General Records
1942-45

Maps and Charts: Military situations, supply and transportation routes, organization charts, topography, locations of airfields, and defenses, primarily in China, Burma, Thailand, and India, 1942-45 (159 items).

493.3 Records of the U.S. Military Mission to China
1941-42

History: Commonly referred to as "AMMISCA" ("American Mission to China"). Established August 27, 1941, to facilitate lend-lease aid to China. Headed by Brig. Gen. John Magruder. Functions and personnel absorbed by Headquarters American Army Forces, China, Burma, India (predecessor of U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma-India see 493.4), by May 1942. Discontinued by September 1944.

Textual Records: Incoming weekly reports, September 1941-January 1942. Outgoing messages, February-December 1942.

493.4 Records of Headquarters U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma- India (HQ USAF CBI)
1942-44

History: Headquarters American Army Forces, China, Burma, and India (HQ AAF CBI) established in Chungking, China, by General Order 1, HQ AAF CBI, March 4, 1942, pursuant to Secretary of War's appointment of Maj. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell as Commanding General of all U.S. Army forces in China, Burma, and India, conveyed in a Chief of Staff memorandum to the Adjutant General, WPD 4389-64, February 2, 1942. (By same memorandum, Gen. Stilwell was appointed Republic of China army chief of staff.) By May 1942, HQ AAF CBI had absorbed Chungking staff of U.S. Military Mission to China, commonly known as "AMMISCA" ("American Mission to China"), established August 27, 1941, to facilitate lend-lease aid to China. A second AAF CBI headquarters was established in New Delhi, India, by letter of the Commanding General, June 25, 1942, pursuant to War Department message 354, sent as CM-OUT 5537, June 22, 1942, in effect instructing Gen. Stilwell to organize a theater of operations staff. Thenceforth, the area of operations over which Gen. Stilwell had command of U.S. Army forces was referred to as the China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater.

By Letter of Instructions, HQ AAF CBI (Chungking), July 6, 1942, Chungking headquarters was designated HQ AAF CBI, and New Delhi headquarters was designated Branch Office, HQ AAF CBI. To avoid confusion with the Army Air Forces' acronym, "AAF," HQ AAF CBI was redesignated HQ USAF CBI, by September 12, 1942. Status of HQ USAF CBI as a theater headquarters was confirmed by letter of the Secretary of War to the Commanding General, USAF CBI, AG 320.2 (1-26-43) OB-I-GN-M, January 29, 1943. HQ AAF CBI redesignated Forward Echelon, HQ USAF CBI and Branch Office, HQ AAF CBI redesignated Rear Echelon, HQ USAF CBI, effective April 1, 1944, by General Order 5, Forward Echelon, HQ USAF CBI, March 31, 1944, with Rear Echelon in charge of overall planning and administration, and Forward Echelon responsible for liaison with Chinese Government and execution of Rear Echelon directives to U.S. Army organizations in China.

Gen. Stilwell recalled by President Roosevelt, October 21, 1944, announced October 28, 1944. By War Department message WARX 52150, October 25, 1944, sent same date as CM-OUT 52150, CBI Theater divided, effective October 24, 1944, into China Theater (see 493.5) and India-Burma Theater (see 493.6).

Textual Records: Official, but personal, records of the Commanding General ("'Eyes Alone' Correspondence"), February 28, 1942-October 30, 1944, consisting of correspondence, memorandums, and messages, and including records relating to his relief from command ("Oklahoma File"). Miscellaneous historical records, ca. 1942-44. Decimal correspondence of the Y-Force Operations Staff, 1942-44, documenting its mission to train and equip Chinese units constituting Y-Force, and acting as liaison between HQ USAF CBI and those units. General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942-44, including central decimal correspondence, incoming messages, and issuances. Circulars of Headquarters Rear Echelon, 1942-44. Records of the Services of Supply (SOS), China-Burma-India, 1942-44, including an organizational history, staff memorandums, SOS general orders, and general orders of Advance Section 1.

Microfilm Publications: M1419.

493.5 Records of Headquarters U.S. Forces, China Theater (HQ USF CT)
1941-46

History: See 493.4 for a history of predecessor Headquarters U.S. Army Forces, China, Burma, and India. HQ USF CT established in Chungking by General Order 1, HQ USF CT, October 25, 1944, under command of Maj. Gen. Albert C. Wedemeyer, appointed effective October 24, 1944. Moved to Shanghai, October 14, 1945. Abolished, effective May 1, 1946, by General Order 97, HQ USF CT, April 29, 1946, with residual functions transferred to Headquarters U.S. Army Forces in China (HQ USAF China), established by General Order 1, May 1, 1946. HQ USAF China abolished, effective July 1, 1946, by HQ USAF China message CFBX 0346, June 28, 1946, received as CM-IN 6332, June 29, 1946.

Textual Records: Records of the Office of the Commanding General, 1944-46. Records concerning the Command and General Staff School at the Chinese Training Center, Kunming ("Col. Elbert Martin's Files"), 1944-45. General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, ca. 1944-46, including central correspondence, messages, daily bulletins and other issuances, and historical narratives. Records of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section, 1943-46, including records dealing with the Sino Translation and Interrogation Center. Records of the G-3 (Operations) Section, ca. 1944-46, consisting of general correspondence, and records relating to personnel assignments. Records of the G-5 (Civil Affairs) Section, ca. 1944-46, including messages concerning the recovery of downed U.S. airmen and prisoners of war, 1945. Records, ca. 1944-46, of the following special staff sections: Interpreter Affairs, Lend-Lease, Ordnance, Provost Marshal, Quartermaster, Theater Planning, and Transportation. Records of Headquarters Rear Echelon, 1941-45, consisting of general records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, and subject files of the Theater Psychological Warfare Officer. Records of general and special staff sections, and subordinate commands, of the Services of Supply (SOS), China Theater, 1942-45 (bulk 1944-45). Records of general and special staff sections of the joint Chinese- American Services of Supply for the Chinese Army, February- September 1945. Records of the following Chinese training and combat commands under U.S. supervision: Z-Force Operations Staff, 1943-44 and Chinese Combat Command (Provisional), 1943-45, including records of subordinate commands.

493.6 Records of Headquarters U.S. Forces, India-Burma Theater (HQ USF IBT)
1942-46

History: See 493.4 for a history of predecessor Headquarters U.S. Army Forces, China, Burma, and India. HQ USF IBT established in New Delhi by General Order 1, HQ USF IBT, October 27, 1944, under command of Lt. Gen. Daniel I. Sultan, appointed effective October 24, 1944. Responsible for U.S. forces in India, Ceylon, Burma, Thailand, the Malay States, and Sumatra. Gen. Sultan succeeded in command by Maj. Gen. Raymond A. Wheeler, June 23, 1945. HQ USF IBT moved to Calcutta, April 15, 1946. Abolished, effective May 31, 1946, by General Order 174, HQ USF IBT, May 23, 1946.

Textual Records: Correspondence and reports relating to activities of the Chinese Army in India, 1942-45. General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1944-45, including central decimal correspondence, messages, and records concerning plans and operations. Correspondence and daily intelligence summaries of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section, 1944-45. Correspondence, subject files, and records of meetings of the G-4 (Logistics) Section, 1944-45. Correspondence, issuances, and other records of the following special staff organizations: Army Exchange Service, Chaplain, Chemical Warfare, Claims, Theater Claims, Engineer, Fiscal, Historical, Inspector General (Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment), Judge Advocate General, Medical, Ordnance, Port of Debarkation, Postal, Provost Marshal, Public Relations, Rest Camps, Signal, Special Services, and Transportation. General correspondence and staff section records of the Ledo Area Command, 1943-46. Correspondence and messages of the Detachment, U.S. Army in India, 1943-46.

493.7 Records of the U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters
1946-47

History: Executive Headquarters established in Peiping (Peking), China, by order of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, January 11, 1946, as a tripartite organization of the Chinese Nationalist Government, the Chinese Communist Party, and the U.S. Government. Responsible for effecting a cease-fire between Chinese Nationalist and Communist forces, as agreed upon, December 1945, by the Committee of Three, consisting of Gen. Chang Chun for the Nationalists Gen. Chou En-lai for the Communists and Gen. George C. Marshall, special envoy of the President. Pursuant to an announcement, January 29, 1947, of U.S. Government's intent to withdraw from Committee of Three and Executive Headquarters, U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters was abolished by U.S. Branch memorandum CDR 902, February 6, 1947, with residual functions transferred to Sino Liaison Office, established in Peiping Headquarters Group by same memorandum.

Textual Records: Records of the U.S. Commissioner, 1946-47, including memorandums sent to and received from the Chinese Nationalist and Communist commissioners and memorandums sent to the Chinese Nationalist and Communist branches. General records of the Director of Operations, 1946-47. Records of the U.S. Branch staff, 1946-47, consisting of a subject file of the Chief of Staff and correspondence, reports, and other records of the Conflict Control, Communications, Army Reorganization, and Public Relations Groups, and the Current Section. Subject file and other records of the Advance Section, 1946-47. Records relating to the Yenan Liaison Group, 1946-47.

Related Records: "Operations Report, the Executive Headquarters, Peiping China, 1946-47" (Section I: "U.S. Branch, Executive Headquarters" Section II: "Peiping Headquarters Group"), 4 vols., submitted April 2, 1947, in Operations and Plans Division decimal correspondence, 1946-48, decimal 091 China, case 112, in RG 319, Records of the Army Staff.

493.8 Records of the Peiping Headquarters Group
1946-47

History: Established, effective January 11, 1946, by General Order 12, Headquarters U.S. Forces, China Theater (HQ USF CT), January 14, 1946, with mission to assist U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters . Brig. Gen. Henry A. Byroade served simultaneously as Peiping Headquarters Group commanding general and Executive Headquarters director of operations, January 11- June 6, 1946, as did his successor, Brig. Gen. T.S. Timberman, June 6, 1946-October 12, 1947. Following abolition of HQ USF CT, April 30, 1946, Peiping Headquarters Group assigned to newly established Headquarters U.S. Army Forces in China (HQ USAF China), May 1, 1946. Effective July 1, 1946, by HQ USAF China message CFBX 0346, June 28, 1946, received as CM-IN 6332, June 29, 1946, HQ USAF China abolished, with Peiping Headquarters Group designated an independent command directly responsible to War Department. All Peiping Headquarters Group organizations except Peiping Depot abolished, effective April 8, 1947, by General Order 49, HQ Peiping Headquarters Group, April 3, 1947, with Peiping Depot reassigned to Army Advisory Group, Nanking.

Textual Records: General correspondence, 1946-47. Message files, 1946-47. Records of the Historical Section, 1946-47, including a subject file, news bulletins, a history of Executive Headquarters, and diaries and histories of field teams. General records, 1946-47, of the Headquarters Detachment, Office of the Surgeon, Special Services Section, Transportation Section, and Peiping Depot.

Related Records: "Operations Report, the Executive Headquarters, Peiping China, 1946-47" (Section I: "U.S. Branch, Executive Headquarters" Section II: "Peiping Headquarters Group"), 4 vols., submitted April 2, 1947 and "Report of Inactivation, Peiping Headquarters Group, 5 February 1947-8 April 1947," submitted April 5, 1947, in Operations and Plans Division decimal correspondence, 1946-48, decimal 091 China, case 112, in RG 319, Records of the Army Staff.

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


U.S. Lieutenant General Daniel I. Sultan explains why troops are needed in India and Burma during World War II

World War II film about the China, Burma, India (CBI) Theater of Operations. A soldier is seen filling out a form seeking information about him and inviting him to write in questions about anything he hadn't learned through normal information channels. Scene shifts to Information and Education Department of the Burma-India Command, where it is being processed by a soldier. Lieutenant General Dan I. Sultan, commander of Burma-India Theater, is seen next, seated at a desk, with wall map of the region behind him. He is appearing in an information film intended to inform troops under his command. He notes that more than half the troops who filled out the information form, asked why American troops were stationed in India and Burma. He refers to the recent recall of General Stillwell and the splitting of CBI into two theaters (China and India/Burma). He states that the purpose is a path toward Japan. An animated map shows China (that narrator notes has been fighting Japan since 1937). Animation shows Japan walling off China from the outside world, by seizing her ports, and then concentrating its grip on the Eastern part of the country. Without access by sea, the allies had only one option to assist China in the fight against Japan. That was to open the Burma Road. Film shifts to scenes of Japanese bombing of Shanghai and Chinese civilians abandoning the city. Wounded and injured Chinese fighting fires while tending casualties in an open area. Glimpse of Chinese soldiers near one of their few large artillery pieces. A gun crew manning one of her few antiaircraft guns. Chinese jam road in trek to the unoccupied provinces of the country. Chinese carrying casualties on stretchers, making do without ambulances. Chinese coping in the face of all kinds of shortages. In contrast, well supplied Japanese troops are shown in formation. Japanese troops, military vehicles and equipment are seen. Japanese firing machine guns and heavy artillery against Chinese positions. Japanese armor and long lines of troops engaged against the Chinese, who continue to resist in spite of shortages and hardship. Chinese soldiers without shoes, marching in a column.

This historic stock footage available in HD video. View pricing below video player.


Sultan, Daniel Isom (1885-1947)

Daniel Sultan was born in Mississippi and attended the University of Mississippi before graduating from West Point in 1907 as an engineer. He graduated from the Engineer School in 1910 and helped construct the fortifications on Corregidor during the First World War. He graduated from the Command and General Staff School in 1923 and the Army War College in 1926 and was involved in numerous civil engineering projects during the late 1920s and early 1930s. He was promoted to brigadier general in December 1938 and commanded the Hawaiian Division in 1941.

The outbreak of war found Sultan in command of 38 Division in Mississippi. He commanded VII Corps in late 1942 before being named as deputy to Stilwell in the China-Burma-India theater in January 1943. He was responsible for developing a road for military supplies from northeast India to China (the Ledo Road).

Dan Sultan is the best thing that ever happened to the theater.

Promoted to lieutenant general in September 1944, Sultan took command of Burma-India on the recall of Stilwell in October. He commanded two Chinese armies and a British division in support of Slim's November 1944 offensive, but his Chinese divisions were recalled to China by Chiang Kai-shek once Lashio was captured. With no army to command, Sultan was recalled to Washington in July 1945, where he became the first soldier to be awarded a fourth Distinguished Service Medal.

Sullivan was a superb engineer and had a firm grasp of logistics. His integrity and loyalty were unimpeachable.

Service record

1885

Born in Mississippi
1907
Second lieutenant
Graduates from West Point, standing 9th in a class of 111
1912

Instructor, West Point
1916

Corps of Engineers, Manila
1918

War Department General Staff
1929

Nicaragua Canal Survey
1934

Engineering Commissioner, District of Columbia
1938

Commander, 2 Engineer Regiment
1938-12
Brigadier general

1939

Commander, 22 Brigade, Hawaii
1941
Major general Commander, Hawaiian Division
1941-4

Commander, 38 Division
1942-4

Commander, VII Corps
1943-1

Deputy commander, U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma-India Theater of Operations
1944-9
Lieutenant general

1944-10-27

Commander, U.S. Burma-India Theater of Operations
1945-7-14

Inspector-General of the Army
1947-1-14

Dies

The Pacific War Online Encyclopedia © 2007-2008, 2011 by Kent G. Budge. Index


Records, RG 338

In 2001 NARA began a project to reallocate many RG 338 records into new record groups, organized around the major army commands. The reallocation project was completed in 2003. This chapter has been annotated to identify the new record group designations for the reallocated records.

Table of Contents

    Administrative History Records of Commands Operating in North America, World War II 1936-52
      Records of defense commands Records of service commands, departments, and base commands Records of schools and training centers
      Records of European Theater of Operations U.S. Army (ETOUSA)/U.S. Forces European Theater (USFET) Records of Mediterranean Theater of Operations U.S. Army (MTOUSA) Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Middle East (USAFIME)/Headquarters Africa-Middle East Theater (AMET) Records of other commands
      Records of the U.S. Military Mission to China Records of U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma-India (USAF CBI) Records of U.S. Army Forces, China Theater (USAF CT) Records of U.S. Forces, India-Burma Theater (USF IBT) Records of the U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters Records of the Peiping Headquarters Group
      Records of the Hawaiian Department Records of the Military Government of Hawaii Records of the Central Pacific Base Command Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Middle Pacific (MIDPAC) Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) Records of U.S. Army Forces in Australia Records of U.S. Army Services of Supply, Southwest Pacific Area Records of U.S. Army Forces, Western Pacific (AFWESPAC) Records of General Headquarters Southwest Pacific Area (GHQ SWPA) Records of U.S. Army Forces, Pacific (AFPAC) Records of U.S. Army Forces, South Pacific Base Command
      Records of U.S. Army, Alaska Records of U.S. Army, Caribbean
      Records of U.S. Army, European Command (EUCOM) Records of U.S. Army, Europe (USAEUR) Records of U.S. Forces, Austria Records of Vienna Area Command Records of Berlin Command/Brigade Records of Trieste, United States Troops (TRUST)
      Records of First Army Records of Second Army Records of Third Army Records of Fourth Army Records of Fifth Army Records of Sixth Army Records of Seventh Army Records of Eighth Army Records of Ninth Army Records of Tenth Army Records of Fifteenth Army
      Records of corps Records of subordinate commands
      Records of activities Records of advisory groups Records of agencies Records of depots Records of hospitals Records of laboratories Records of organizations concerned with prisoner of war and missing in action information Records of schools Records of transportation zones Records of other support elements

    338.1 Administrative History

    Security-Classified Records: This record group may include material that is security-classified.

    Related Records:

    • Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, RG 92.
    • Records of U.S. Army Commands, 1784-1821, RG 98.
    • Records of the Office of the Surgeon General (Army), RG 112.
    • Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, RG 165.
    • Records of Naval Operating Forces, RG 313.
    • Records of Allied Operational and Occupation Headquarters, World War II, RG 331.
    • Records of the Office of the Chief of Transportation, RG 336.
    • Records of Headquarters Army Ground Forces, RG 337.
    • Records of U.S. Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations, RG 342.
    • Records of the Office of the Provost Marshal General, 1941- , RG 389.
    • Records of U.S. Regular Army Mobile Units, 1821-1942, RG 391.
    • Records of U.S. Army Coast Artillery Districts and Defenses, 1901-1942, RG 392.
    • Records of U.S. Army Continental Commands, 1821-1920, RG 393.
    • Records of U.S. Army Continental Commands, 1920-1942, RG 394.
    • Records of U.S. Army Overseas Operations and Commands, 1898-1942, RG 395.
    • Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1917- , RG 407.
    • Records of Mediterranean Theater of Operations, United States Army, RG 492.
    • Records of U.S. Forces in the China-Burma-India Theaters of Operations, RG 493.
    • Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Middle Pacific (World War II), RG 494.
    • Records of Headquarters, United States Army Forces, Western Pacific (World War II), RG 495.
    • Records of General Headquarters, Southwest Pacific Area and United States Army Forces, Pacific (World War II), RG 496.
    • Records of the Africa-Middle East Theater of Operations (World War II Army), RG 497.
    • Records of Headquarters, European Theater of Operations, United States Army (World War II), RG 498.
    • Records of U.S. Army Defense Commands (World War II), RG 499.
    • Records of the United States Army Materiel Command, RG 544.
    • Records of U.S. Army Forces in Alaska, RG 547.
    • Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Caribbean, RG 548.
    • Records of United States Army, Europe, RG 549.
    • Records of United States Army, Pacific, RG 550.
    • Records of the United States Army Military District of Washington, RG 551.
    • Records of the Military Traffic Management Command (Army), RG 552.
    • Records of the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command, RG 553.
    • Records of General Headquarters, Far East Command, Supreme Commander Allied Powers, and United Nations Command, RG 554.

    338.2 Records of Commands Operating in North America, World War II
    1936-52

    338.2.1 Records of defense commands

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 499, except as noted): Records of Eastern Defense Command, 1940-45, including proceedings of harbor defense boards and Chesapeake Bay sector historical files. Records of Western Defense Command, 1940-46, including portions of the central decimal file, and a microfilm copy of records of Japanese relocation centers (620 rolls). Records of Central Defense Command, 1941-46, including records of Central Air Defense Region, Fort Bray, MI, 1942-44. Records of Alaska Defense Command/Alaska Department, 1940-47, including issuances and intelligence reports (reallocated to RG 547). Records of Caribbean Defense Command, 1941-48 (reallocated to RG 548).

    338.2.2 Records of service commands, departments, and base commands

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 160, except as noted): Records of the following service commands: First, headquartered in Boston, MA, 1942-46 Second, headquartered on Governors Island, NY, 1942-46 Third, headquartered in Baltimore, MD, 1942-46, including intelligence report files, 1943-46, and records relating to German prisoners of war, 1944-45 Fourth, headquartered in Atlanta, GA, 1942-46, including correspondence of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section and plant protection survey reports Fifth, headquartered in Columbus, OH, 1942-46, including intelligence summaries and plant protection survey reports Sixth, headquartered in Chicago, IL, 1942-46, including G-2 (Intelligence) Section files Seventh, headquartered in Omaha, NE, 1936-46, including reports of investigations of aircraft accidents Eighth, headquartered in San Antonio and Dallas, TX, 1942-46 Ninth, headquartered at The Presidio, San Francisco, CA, 1942-46 and Northwest, headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 1942-45. Records of the Military District of Washington, 1942-46 (reallocated to RG 551). Record set of issuances of U.S. Army Forces, Central Canada, 1943-45 (reallocated to RG 165). Records of the Panama Canal Department, 1940-47 and records of the Puerto Rican/Antilles Department, 1939-47 (reallocated to RG 548). Records of base commands in Bermuda, 1941-46, Iceland, 1941-47, and Newfoundland, 1941-46 (reallocated to RG 499).

    Maps (reallocated to RG 160): Geographic index to quadrangle maps covering the northeastern United States, by First Service Command, 1943 (1 item). Military installations location map covering TX, AR, and LA, by Eighth Service Command, 1942 (1 item).

    Architectural Plans (reallocated to RG 160): Floor plan of McCaw General Hospital, Walla Walla, WA, by Ninth Service Command, ca. 1942 (1 item).

    338.2.3 Records of schools and training centers

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 337) : Records of the Airborne Command/Parachute School, 1942-46 Amphibious Training Center, 1940-50 Antiaircraft Artillery Command Training Center, 1940-50 Armored Center/Board, 1939-48 Cavalry Center/School, 1940-46 Coast Artillery School, 1945 Field Artillery Board, 1942-45 and Tank Destroyer Center, 1941-46.

    Posters (reallocated to RG 337): Of the U.S. Army Field Artillery School, advertising artillery jobs, ca. 1951-52 (AP, 5 items).

    338.3 Records of Commands in the European, Mediterranean, and
    Africa-Middle East Theaters of Operations, World War II
    1941-48

    338.3.1 Records of European Theater of Operations U.S. Army
    (ETOUSA)/U.S. Forces European Theater (USFET)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 498): Decimal correspondence, interrogation reports, personnel rosters, awards files, and other records, 1941-47, of the General Staff Secretary the following general staff sections: G-1 (Personnel), G-2 (Intelligence), G-3 (Operations), and G-4 (Logistics) the following special staff sections for administrative matters: Adjutant General (including the Postal Division), Civil Affairs, Finance, Historical, Judge Advocate General, Provost Marshal, and Public Relations the following special staff sections for technical matters: Engineer, Ordnance, Quartermaster, Signal, Surgeon General (Medical), and Transportation the General Board the General Purchasing Agency Theater Service Forces European Theater and Communications Zone ETOUSA. Escape and evasion reports of the MIS-X (Military Intelligence Service, Escape and Evasion Section) Detachment, 1943-45.

    338.3.2 Records of Mediterranean Theater of Operations U.S. Army
    (MTOUSA)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 492): Records of headquarters organizations, 1942-47, including the staff of the Commanding General, general and special staff sections, and boards and committees. Records of subordinate commands, 1942-47, including Allied Armies in Italy Headquarters Command Allied Forces and Atlantic, Eastern, Mediterranean, and Peninsular Base Sections. Correspondence, tract books, logs, a history, and other records of the Military Liquidating Agency, 1945-48.

    338.3.3 Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Middle East
    (USAFIME)/Headquarters Africa-Middle East Theater (AMET)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 497): Records, 1942-46, including "Land of Jerusalem" reports, weekly summaries, and Military Intelligence Division reports.

    338.3.4 Records of other commands

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 497): General correspondence and other records of Persian Gulf Command (known as Persian Gulf Service Command, 1942-43), 1942-45. General orders and other issuances of Eritrea Service/Base Command, 1942-45. Records of North African Service Command relating to construction in Dakar, French West Africa (Senegal), 1942-43. Correspondence, memorandums, and orders of U.S. Forces in Central Africa, 1942-43.

    Maps (reallocated to RG 497): Maps of Persian Gulf Command, 1943-44.

    338.4 Records of Commands in the China-Burma-India Theaters of
    Operations, World War II
    1941-47

    338.4.1 Records of the U.S. Military Mission to China

    History: Commonly referred to as "AMMISCA" ("American Mission to China"). Established August 27, 1941, to facilitate lend-lease aid to China. Headed by Brig. Gen. John Magruder. Functions and personnel absorbed by Headquarters American Army Forces, China, Burma, India (predecessor of U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma-India see 338.4.2), by May 1942. Discontinued by September 1944.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 493): Incoming weekly reports, September 1941-January 1942. Outgoing messages, February-December 1942.

    338.4.2 Records of U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma-India (USAF CBI)

    History: Headquarters American Army Forces, China, Burma, and India (HQ AAF CBI) established in Chungking, China, by General Order 1, HQ AAF CBI, March 4, 1942, pursuant to Secretary of War's appointment of Maj. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell as Commanding General of all U.S. Army forces in China, Burma, and India, conveyed in a Chief of Staff memorandum to the Adjutant General, WPD 4389-64, February 2, 1942. (By same memorandum, Gen. Stilwell was appointed Republic of China army chief of staff.) By May 1942, HQ AAF CBI had absorbed Chungking staff of U.S. Military Mission to China, commonly known as "AMMISCA" ("American Mission to China"), established August 27, 1941, to facilitate lend-lease aid to China. A second AAF CBI headquarters was established in New Delhi, India, by letter of the Commanding General, June 25, 1942, pursuant to War Department message 354, sent as CM-OUT 5537, June 22, 1942, in effect instructing Gen. Stilwell to organize a theater of operations staff. Thenceforth, the area of operations over which Gen. Stilwell had command of U.S. Army forces was referred to as the China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater.

    By Letter of Instructions, HQ AAF CBI (Chungking), July 6, 1942, Chungking headquarters was designated HQ AAF CBI, and New Delhi headquarters was designated Branch Office, HQ AAF CBI. To avoid confusion with the Army Air Forces' acronym, "AAF," HQ AAF CBI was redesignated HQ USAF CBI, by September 12, 1942. Status of HQ USAF CBI as a theater headquarters was confirmed by letter of the Secretary of War to the Commanding General, USAF CBI, AG 320.2 (1-26-43) OB-I-GN-M, January 29, 1943. HQ AAF CBI redesignated Forward Echelon, HQ USAF CBI and Branch Office, HQ AAF CBI redesignated Rear Echelon, HQ USAF CBI, effective April 1, 1944, by General Order 5, Forward Echelon, HQ USAF CBI, March 31, 1944, with Rear Echelon in charge of overall planning and administration, and Forward Echelon responsible for liaison with Chinese Government and execution of Rear Echelon directives to U.S. Army organizations in China.

    Gen. Stilwell recalled by President Roosevelt, October 21, 1944, announced October 28, 1944. By War Department message WARX 52150, October 25, 1944, sent same date as CM-OUT 52150, CBI Theater divided, effective October 24, 1944, into China Theater (see 338.4.3) and India-Burma Theater (see 338.4.4).

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 493): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942-44, including central decimal correspondence, incoming messages, and issuances. Circulars of Headquarters Rear Echelon, 1942-44. Records of the Services of Supply (SOS), China-Burma-India, 1942-44, including an organizational history, staff memorandums, SOS general orders, and general orders of Advance Section 1.

    Related Records (reallocated to RG 493): Additional records of USAF CBI in RG 332, Records of U.S. Theaters of War, World War II.

    338.4.3 Records of U.S. Army Forces, China Theater (USAF CT)

    History: See 338.4.2 for a history of predecessor Headquarters U.S. Army Forces, China, Burma, and India. HQ USF CT established in Chungking by General Order 1, HQ USF CT, October 25, 1944, under command of Maj. Gen. Albert C. Wedemeyer, appointed effective October 24, 1944. Moved to Shanghai, October 14, 1945. Abolished, effective May 1, 1946, by General Order 97, HQ USF CT, April 29, 1946, with residual functions transferred to Headquarters U.S. Army Forces in China (HQ USAF China), established by General Order 1, May 1, 1946. HQ USAF China abolished, effective July 1, 1946, by HQ USAF China message CFBX 0346, June 28, 1946, received as CM-IN 6332, June 29, 1946.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 493): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, ca. 1944-46, including central correspondence, messages, daily bulletins and other issuances, and historical narratives. Records of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section, 1943-46, including records dealing with the Sino Translation and Interrogation Center. Records of the G-3 (Operations) Section, ca. 1944-46, consisting of general correspondence, and records relating to personnel assignments. Records of the G-5 (Civil Affairs) Section, ca. 1944-46, including messages concerning the recovery of downed U.S. airmen and prisoners of war, 1945. Records, ca. 1944-46, of the following special staff sections: Interpreter Affairs, Lend-Lease, Ordnance, Provost Marshal, Quartermaster, Theater Planning, and Transportation. Records of Headquarters Rear Echelon, 1941-45, consisting of general records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, and subject files of the Theater Psychological Warfare Officer. Records of general and special staff sections, and subordinate commands, of the Services of Supply (SOS), China Theater, 1942-45 (bulk 1944-45). Records of general and special staff sections of the joint Chinese- American Services of Supply for the Chinese Army, February- September 1945. Records of the following Chinese training and combat commands under U.S. supervision: Z-Force Operations Staff, 1943-44 and Chinese Combat Command (Provisional), 1943-45, including records of subordinate commands.

    338.4.4 Records of U.S. Forces, India-Burma Theater (USF IBT)

    History: See 338.4.2 for a history of predecessor Headquarters U.S. Army Forces, China, Burma, and India. HQ USF IBT established in New Delhi by General Order 1, HQ USF IBT, October 27, 1944, under command of Lt. Gen. Daniel I. Sultan, appointed effective October 24, 1944. Responsible for U.S. forces in India, Ceylon, Burma, Thailand, the Malay States, and Sumatra. Gen. Sultan succeeded in command by Maj. Gen. Raymond A. Wheeler, June 23, 1945. HQ USF IBT moved to Calcutta, April 15, 1946. Abolished, effective May 31, 1946, by General Order 174, HQ USF IBT, May 23, 1946.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 493): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1944-45, including central decimal correspondence, messages, and records concerning plans and operations. Correspondence and daily intelligence summaries of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section, 1944-45. Correspondence, subject files, and records of meetings of the G-4 (Logistics) Section, 1944-45. Correspondence, issuances, and other records of the following special staff organizations: Army Exchange Service, Chaplain, Chemical Warfare, Claims, Theater Claims, Engineer, Fiscal, Historical, Inspector General (Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment), Judge Advocate General, Medical, Ordnance, Port of Debarkation, Postal, Provost Marshal, Public Relations, Rest Camps, Signal, Special Services, and Transportation. General correspondence and staff section records of the Ledo Area Command, 1943-46. Correspondence and messages of the Detachment, U.S. Army in India, 1943-46.

    338.4.5 Records of the U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters

    History: Executive Headquarters established in Peiping (Peking), China, by order of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, January 11, 1946, as a tripartite organization of the Chinese Nationalist Government, the Chinese Communist Party, and the U.S. Government. Responsible for effecting a cease-fire between Chinese Nationalist and Communist forces, as agreed upon, December 1945, by the Committee of Three, consisting of Gen. Chang Chun for the Nationalists Gen. Chou En-lai for the Communists and Gen. George C. Marshall, special envoy of the President. Pursuant to an announcement, January 29, 1947, of U.S. Government's intent to withdraw from Committee of Three and Executive Headquarters, U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters was abolished by U.S. Branch memorandum CDR 902, February 6, 1947, with residual functions transferred to Sino Liaison Office, established in Peiping Headquarters Group by same memorandum.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 493): Records of the U.S. Commissioner, 1946-47, including memorandums sent to and received from the Chinese Nationalist and Communist commissioners and memorandums sent to the Chinese Nationalist and Communist branches. General records of the Director of Operations, 1946-47. Records of the U.S. Branch staff, 1946-47, consisting of a subject file of the Chief of Staff and correspondence, reports, and other records of the Conflict Control, Communications, Army Reorganization, and Public Relations Groups, and the Current Section. Subject file and other records of the Advance Section, 1946-47. Records relating to the Yenan Liaison Group, 1946-47.

    Related Records (reallocated to RG 493): "Operations Report, the Executive Headquarters, Peiping China, 1946-47" (Section I: "U.S. Branch, Executive Headquarters" Section II: "Peiping Headquarters Group"), 4 vols., submitted April 2, 1947, in Operations and Plans Division decimal correspondence, 1946-48, decimal 091 China, case 112, in RG 319, Records of the Army Staff.

    338.4.6 Records of the Peiping Headquarters Group

    History: Established, effective January 11, 1946, by General Order 12, Headquarters U.S. Forces, China Theater (HQ USF CT), January 14, 1946, with mission to assist U.S. Branch of Executive Headquarters. Brig. Gen. Henry A. Byroade served simultaneously as Peiping Headquarters Group commanding general and Executive Headquarters director of operations, January 11- June 6, 1946, as did his successor, Brig. Gen. T.S. Timberman, June 6, 1946-October 12, 1947. Following abolition of HQ USF CT, April 30, 1946, Peiping Headquarters Group assigned to newly established Headquarters U.S. Army Forces in China (HQ USAF China), May 1, 1946. Effective July 1, 1946, by HQ USAF China message CFBX 0346, June 28, 1946, received as CM-IN 6332, June 29, 1946, HQ USAF China abolished, with Peiping Headquarters Group designated an independent command directly responsible to War Department. All Peiping Headquarters Group organizations except Peiping Depot abolished, effective April 8, 1947, by General Order 49, HQ Peiping Headquarters Group, April 3, 1947, with Peiping Depot reassigned to Army Advisory Group, Nanking.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 493): General correspondence, 1946-47. Message files, 1946-47. Records of the Historical Section, 1946-47, including a subject file, news bulletins, a history of Executive Headquarters, and diaries and histories of field teams. General records, 1946-47, of the Headquarters Detachment, Office of the Surgeon, Special Services Section, Transportation Section, and Peiping Depot.

    Related Records (reallocated to RG 493): "Operations Report, the Executive Headquarters, Peiping China, 1946-47" (Section I: "U.S. Branch, Executive Headquarters" Section II: "Peiping Headquarters Group"), 4 vols., submitted April 2, 1947 and "Report of Inactivation, Peiping Headquarters Group, 5 February 1947-8 April 1947," submitted April 5, 1947, in Operations and Plans Division decimal correspondence, 1946-48, decimal 091 China, case 112, in RG 319, Records of the Army Staff.

    338.5 Records of Commands in Pacific Theaters of Operations,
    World War II
    1922-47

    338.5.1 Records of the Hawaiian Department

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 494): Records of the Signal Office/Section, 1922-43. Correspondence, records of investigations, and construction reports of the Engineer Office, 1942-45.

    338.5.2 Records of the Military Government of Hawaii

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 494): Records, 1941-46, including executive correspondence, decimal correspondence, internee case files, internee property files, press releases, and correspondence concerning transport of civilians to Hawaii. Provost court case files, 1942-45. Indexes to case files of the Alien Registration Bureau, 1941-46. Reports of the Inspector General Section, 1942.

    338.5.3 Records of the Central Pacific Base Command

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 494): Weekly and monthly summary reports of the G-4 (Logistics) Section, 1944-45. General correspondence of the Signal Section, 1935-45. Reports and other records of the Engineer, Fiscal, Medical, Ordnance, Special Services, and Transportation Sections, 1935-47.

    338.5.4 Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Middle Pacific
    (MIDPAC)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 494): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, consisting of central correspondence, 1941-46 messages, 1939-43 and issuances, 1941-46, including Chief of Staff directives, 1942-44. Records relating to maneuvers and exercises, 1939-43. Records of general and special staff sections, 1941-47, including subject correspondence of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section daily reports of the G-3 (Operations) Section and construction reports of the Engineer Section.

    338.5.5 Records of U.S. Army Forces in the Far East (USAFFE)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 496): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942-45, including central correspondence, incoming and outgoing messages, and issuances. Records of general and special staff sections, 1942-45, including reports and bulletins of the Counter Intelligence Section, 1944-45 and records of the Theater Censor, 1942-45, the General Purchasing Agent, 1942-45, and the Fiscal Director, 1945.

    338.5.6 Records of U.S. Army Forces in Australia

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 495): General and special orders and other issuances, 1941-42, including special orders of the Liaison Officer, 1942.

    338.5.7 Records of U.S. Army Services of Supply

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 495): Records of the Commanding General, 1943-45. General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942- 45, including central correspondence, messages, reports, issuances, and organization manuals. Records of general and special staff sections, 1942-46.

    338.5.8 Records of U.S. Army Forces, Western Pacific (AFWESPAC)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 495): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942-45, including central correspondence, issuances, planning files, and organization manuals. Records, 1941-46 (bulk 1942-46), of the following special staff sections: Chemical, Engineer, Information and Education, Medical, Ordnance, Philippine Army, Provost Marshal, Quartermaster, Signal, Special Services, and Transportation.

    338.5.9 Records of General Headquarters Southwest Pacific Area
    (GHQ SWPA)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 496): Central correspondence maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942-46. Records of general and special staff sections, 1942-46. Drafts of General Douglas MacArthur's reports on the war in the Pacific, 1942-46.

    Related Records: Additional records of GHQ SWPA Psych War reallocated to RG 496.

    338.5.10 Records of U.S. Army Forces, Pacific (AFPAC)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 496): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1944-46, including central correspondence, issuances, and incoming and outgoing messages. Records of general and special staff organizations, 1944-46, including correspondence of the G-3 (Operations) and G-4 (Logistics) Sections, 1944-46 records of the Civil Affairs Section, 1945, and the Engineer Section, 1945-46 and records of the Theater Censor, 1943-45. Correspondence and reports of the Pacific Warfare Board, 1944-45.

    Maps (reallocated to RG 496): Published maps of Japan, acquired from local sources, 1945-46 (5 items).

    338.5.11 Records of U.S. Army Forces, South Pacific Base Command

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 494): Records of general and special staff sections, 1942-46. Records relating to units formed in accordance with standard tables of organization and equipment ("T/O&E Units"), 1942-45.

    338.6 Records of Commands in the Western Hemisphere, Post World
    War II
    1942-64

    338.6.1 Records of U.S. Army, Alaska

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 547): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, ca. 1947-56, including central correspondence, issuances, and incoming and outgoing messages. Records of general and special staff sections, 1942-50 (bulk 1947-50), including administrative records of the Quartermaster Section, 1942-50.

    338.6.2 Records of U.S. Army, Caribbean

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 548): Records of headquarters, including correspondence, ca. 1947-51 defense plans, 1947-51 mission summaries and command reports, 1960-62 operations planning files, 1959-63 orders, 1962-63 operating program progress reports, 1957-60 and military assistance planning files, 1949- 63. Records of the U.S. Army Caribbean School, Ft. Gulick, Canal Zone, 1946-64.

    Maps (reallocated to RG 548): Published maps of American forts in the Panama Canal Zone, 1952-53 (11 items).

    Related Records: Records of Caribbean Command in RG 349, Records of Joint Commands.

    338.7 Records of Commands in Europe, Post World War II
    1933-64

    338.7.1 Records of European Command (EUCOM)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 549): Microfilm copy of decimal correspondence maintained by the Secretary of the General Staff, 1947-52 (19 rolls). Reports of operations, 1947. Records of general and special staff sections, 1942-52, including G-2 (Intelligence) Division interrogation reports on German and Italian prisoners of war and persons in the Soviet Union or Soviet-controlled countries, 1942-49.

    Maps: Published road maps of countries in western Europe, intended for EUCOM headquarters use, 1946-59 (1946-52 maps reallocated to RG 549. 1953-59 maps reallocated to RG 531.)(18 items).

    338.7.2 Records of U.S. Army, Europe (USAEUR)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 549): Records of the War Crimes Branch of the Judge Advocate General Section, including general administrative records, 1942-57 records relating to pre-trial activities, 1944- 51, extradition, 1945-52, and medical experiments, 1933-47 war crimes case files ("Cases Tried"), 1945-59 (212 ft.) war crimes case files ("Cases Not Tried"), 1944-48 (195 ft.) Malmedy Case indexes to defendants and military companies, n.d. German- created name lists, information cards, and indexes to inmates at Buchenwald and Zweiberge Concentration Camps, 1943-45 location and identity cards for witnesses, 1947-48 indexes to war crimes case files, n.d., and witnesses and defendants in war crimes cases, 1946-48 card lists of members of the German 1st SS Panzer Regiment, n.d., suspects and defendants in war crimes cases, n.d., and prisoners requesting clemency or parole, 1952-57 summary sheets on prisoners ("Identification of Prisoners Sheets"), 1945-48 records relating to War Criminal Prison No. 1, Landsberg, Federal Republic of Germany, 1947-57 records relating to parolees ("Parolee Case Files"), 1945-58, and executed prisoners ("Executee Files"), 1946-51 and records relating to post-trial activities, 1945-57. Records of general and special staff sections, 1952-64. Records of Army Communications Zone, Europe, 1950-64.

    Motion Pictures (51 reels) (reallocated to RG 549): Compiled by the War Crimes Branch, Judge Advocate General Section, ca. 1945-47, consisting mainly of concentration camp scenes (including scenes at the Hadamar and Buchenwald camps), and showing identification of victims, reburial of remains, liberation of camp internees, and visits by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Also includes newsreels from the German series, Degeto Weltspiegel (Degeto World Mirror).

    Sound Recordings (reallocated to RG 549): Compiled by the War Crimes Branch, Judge Advocate General Section, ca. 1944, consisting of eyewitness testimony (including that of Pvt. William F. Reem and T/5 Charles Appman) concerning specific incidents connected with the murder of American prisoners of war on May 30, June 8, and December 18, 1944 (4 items).

    Glass Slides (reallocated to RG 549): Exhumed human skeletons, mass graves, and a castle, ca. 1946-48 (WC, 18 images).

    338.7.3 Records of U.S. Forces in Austria

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 260): Central decimal correspondence maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1946-47. Records of general and special staff sections, 1944-56, including reports, intelligence summaries, and investigative files of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section. Final report of the High Commissioner, 1950.

    Map (reallocated to RG 260): Town plan of Gmunden, Austria, 1947 (1 item).

    338.7.4 Records of Vienna Area Command

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 260): Central correspondence, issuances, and other general records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1946- 48. Miscellaneous records, 1946-48.

    338.7.5 Records of Berlin Command/Brigade

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 549): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1946-48, including central decimal correspondence and reports of investigations. Records of boards, 1946-48.

    338.7.6 Records of Trieste United States Troops (TRUST)

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 331): General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1946-54, including correspondence, messages, and command reports. Correspondence of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section, 1951-52.

    338.8 Records of Commands in the Pacific, Post World War II
    1944-72

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 550): Records of Army Ground Forces, Pacific, 1944-48, including central decimal correspondence and issuances maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1947. Records of U.S. Army, Pacific (USARPAC), including central decimal correspondence maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1947-49 records of general and special staff sections, 1949-50 and history and command reporting files, 1950-72. Records of U.S. Army, Hawaii, including correspondence, 1957-63 organizational planning records, 1959-62 and military history files, 1959-63. General records of U.S. Army, Japan, 1957-63, including records relating to the Broadcast and Visual Activity, Pacific, 1957-61.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 554): Records of Far East Command, including records of general and special staff sections, 1946-52. Records of U.S. Army Forces, Far East (AFFE), including records of general and special staff sections, 1952-57. Records of Japan Logistical Command, 1949-52, consisting of correspondence, general and special staff section records, and command reports. Command reports, investigations, and other records of Yokohama Command, 1947-51. General and special staff section records of Marianas-Bonins Command, 1947-52. Records of Ryukyus Command (RYCOM), including central decimal files, 1946-53 a record set of issuances, 1952 organizational planning records, 1951-52 and reports of the Joint Facilities Board, 1947. Records of the Enemy Property Custodian, Philippines Command, 1944-49. Records of general and special staff sections of Philippines-Ryukyus Command, 1946-49. Records of U.S. Army Forces in Korea (USAFIK), 1945-49. Prisoner of war files of the Korean Communications Zone, 1950-55.

    Maps (reallocated to RG 550): Published maps, compiled by USARPAC, showing locations of army, navy, and air force facilities on Oahu, HI, 1951-54 (2 items).

    Posters (reallocated to RG 554): Produced by the Office of Troop Information and Education, AFFE, illustrating the troop information program, 1954-57 (EP, 151 items), and current events ("This Week's News"), 1954-56 (NP, 153 items).

    338.9 RECORDS OF ARMIES
    1925-66

    338.9.1 Records of First Army

    Textual Records: General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, including central correspondence, 1940-50 issuances, 1946-50 and records of the Civilian Personnel Division, 1946-50. Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations), 1944-48 (bulk 1944-45), including messages, 1944-45 operations reports, 1943-44 field orders and letters of instruction, 1944-45 daily journals, 1945 G-3 reports ("Periodic Reports"), 1945 air mission reports, 1945 report of observations of Fifth U.S. Army in Italy, 1944 situation reports, 1945 tabular schedules of U.S. troop movements from Great Britain to France ("Build-Up Priority Tables With Amendments"), 1944 and operations plans, 1943-45. Records of the Offices of the Assistant Chiefs of Staff, G-1 (Personnel), 1944-45 G-2 (Intelligence), 1943-45 G-4 (Logistics), 1944 and G-5 (Civil Affairs), 1944. Records of the Artillery Section, 1944-45 Chemical Section, 1936-47, including chemical warfare intelligence bulletins, 1945 Engineer Section, 1944-51, including records relating to the Siegfried Line, 1944-45 Finance Officer, 1940-42 Medical Section, 1946-50 Ordnance Section, 1944-45, including reports on the rental and occupancy of foreign property Public Information Office, 1931-48 Quartermaster Section, 1944-50, including general correspondence, 1944-46 Signal Section, 1942-45 and Transportation Section, 1942-50. Maneuver Headquarters reports of maneuvers and command post exercises, 1936-41. Records of Special Troops, including general records of Headquarters Special Troops, 1946-48 general correspondence of 4th Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 1944-45 and general correspondence of 12th, 28th, 35th, and 39th Headquarters and Headquarters Detachments, 1945-46. Reports of military government detachments, 1944-45. First Army organizational records, 1948-68.

    338.9.2 Records of Second Army

    Textual Records: General correspondence, 1940-46. General records of the following special staff sections: Inspector General, 1941- 46 Medical, 1944-46 and Quartermaster, 1941-46. Records of the Signal Section, consisting of general correspondence, 1945-46 and records relating to communications security, 1943-45. Records of the Medical Casual Detachment, 1943. Records of the Maneuver Director's Headquarters, 1943-44. Records of Special Troops, consisting of records of Headquarters Special Troops, 1946-47 and memorandums, issuances, and other records, 1942-46, of the following Headquarters and Headquarters Detachments: 2d, 3d, 5th, 7th-9th, 11th-13th, 16th, 17th, 19th, 21st-26th, 29th, 30th, and 33d. Second Army organizational records, 1945-65.

    338.9.3 Records of Third Army

    Textual Records: General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, including central correspondence, 1932-47 and letters received, 1946. Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2 (Intelligence), consisting of general correspondence, 1944-47 and outgoing messages, 1946-47. Reports and outgoing messages of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations), 1945-47. Periodic reports of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 (Logistics), 1944-46. Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-5 (Civil Affairs), consisting of incoming and outgoing messages, 1944-45 reports of military government detachments in France, Luxembourg, and Belgium, 1944-45 and reports of operations of the Civil Affairs Section, 1945-46. Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery Section, consisting of general correspondence, 1942-46 and reports, 1944-45. Daily situation reports of the Engineer Section, 1944-45. Records of the Inspector General Section, consisting of reports of investigations, 1942-47 and correspondence relating to and reports of unit annual inspections, 1940-44. Special court-martial case files of the Judge Advocate General Section, 1943-46. Messages and memorandums of the Graves Registration Service, Quartermaster Section, relating to burials, 1944-45. Messages and reports of the Signal Section, 1944-47. Operations reports and related records of the Director's Headquarters, Third Army Maneuver Area, 1936-44. Records of Special Troops, consisting of general correspondence of Headquarters Special Troops, 1944-46 general orders of 3d Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 1943 and records of 8th Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 1942-43. After- action reports of III Corps, February 1945. Third Army organizational records, 1951-66.

    338.9.4 Records of Fourth Army

    Textual Records: Central correspondence maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1934-47. Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations) relating to joint army-navy defense plans and exercises, 1925-35. General correspondence of the Provisional Administrative Detachment, 1943-45. Records of Headquarters and Headquarters Detachments, Special Troops, 1942-47. Records of consolidated Headquarters Fourth Army and Western Defense Command, including general correspondence, weekly activity reports, issuances, and orders, maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1940-46 situation reports, reports of Japanese balloon sightings, intelligence summaries, and other records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, (Intelligence), 1941-46 miscellaneous records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3 (Operations), 1942-45 daily journal of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 (Logistics), Northern California Sector, 1940-43 memorandums of the Ordnance Section, 1941-46 general correspondence, surface craft detection station status reports, diaries, journals, and logs of the Signal Section, 1941-46 and general correspondence of the Ninth Coast Artillery District, 1940-43. Fourth Army organizational records, 1944-64.

    338.9.5 Records of Fifth Army

    Textual Records: Central correspondence maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1942-45. Correspondence maintained by the Secretary of the General Staff, 1944-45. Correspondence of the Chief of Staff, Western Task Force, 1942-43 and the Chief of Staff, 1943-45. Records of the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2 (Intelligence), including records relating to the invasion of Spanish Morocco, 1943 numbered and miscellaneous reports, 1943-45 numbered weekly intelligence summaries, 1943- 45 and miscellaneous records, 1941-45. Court reports and appointment orders compiled by the Judge Advocate General Section, 1943-45. Records of the Inspector General Section, including case reports, 1943-45 investigations reports from subordinate units, 1943-45 and inspection reports and policy memorandums, 1943-45. Memorials and burial reports of the Graves Registration Service, Quartermaster Section, 1944-45. Correspondence and action reports of the Antiaircraft Artillery Section, 1944-45. Correspondence and reports of the Engineer Section, 1943-45. Reports of the Ordnance Section concerning bomb disposal activities, 1943-45 and weapons intelligence, 1944-45. Correspondence and reports of the Liaison Section in Morocco, 1942-43 and the Liaison Section in Italy, 1944-45. Histories of various units, 1942-45. Fifth Army organizational records, 1944- 64.

    Photographic Prints: II Corps activities in northern Italy, 1944-45 (FA, 1,500 images).

    338.9.6 Records of Sixth Army

    Textual Records: Correspondence and events journals of the Chief of Staff, 1943-45. General correspondence of the G-1 (Personnel) Section, 1944-45. Records of the G-2 (Intelligence) Section, including assessment reports and related records, 1944-45 and card files on the Japanese military establishment, 1943-45, containing unit histories, unit code names and numbers, home designations, information on units on Luzon during the Philippines campaign, and biographies of leading military figures. Records of the G-3 (Operations) Section, including general correspondence, 1943-46 and a journal of the Philippines campaign, 1944-45. Records of the G-4 (Logistics) Section, consisting of general correspondence, 1943-45 and a campaign journal, 1945. Sixth Army organizational records, 1946-66.

    338.9.7 Records of Seventh Army

    Textual Records: Records of general and special staff sections, 1941-46, including orders and investigative records of the Inspector General Section, 1941-46 and decimal correspondence of the Chemical Warfare Section, 1942-46. Seventh Army organizational records, 1950-66.

    338.9.8 Records of Eighth Army

    Textual Records: Central decimal correspondence, 1945-53. Records of general and special staff sections, 1944-53, including records of the Military History Section, 1948-53. Operations planning files, 1945-51. Eighth Army organizational records, 1953-63.

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 554): Records relating to Sugamo Prison, including personnel files of prisoners and prison journals, 1945-52.

    Maps: Published route maps of North and South Korea, 1951-52 (2 items). Railways in communist Far East, 1957 (1 item).

    Maps (reallocated to RG 554): Map of United Nations airfields in South Korea, 1954 (1 item).

    338.9.9 Records of Ninth Army

    Textual Records: Central decimal correspondence, and incoming and outgoing messages, maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1944-45. Records of general and special staff sections, 1944-45, including combat medical statistical reports and military police records.

    338.9.10 Records of Tenth Army

    Textual Records: Incoming messages, 1945. Records of general and special staff sections, 1944-45.

    338.9.11 Records of Fifteenth Army

    Textual Records: General records maintained by the Adjutant General Section, 1944-46, including central decimal correspondence, incoming and outgoing messages, and memorandums. Reports relating to prisoners of war, ca. 1944-46. Records of general and special staff sections, 1944-46.

    338.10 Records of Other Commands
    1940-70

    338.10.1 Records of corps

    Textual Records: Central correspondence, incoming and outgoing messages, issuances, records of general and special staff sections, and other records, of the following corps: I, 1941-45 I Armored, 1941-43 II, 1941-45, 1957-65 III, 1942-46, 1951-66 IV, 1940-45, 1958-67 V, 1940-45, 1949-66 VI, 1940-50, 1957-68 VII, 1941-45, 1953-66 VIII, 1940-45, 1958-62 IX, 1940-47 X, 1941-46, 1958-66 XI, 1942-46, 1958-65 XII, 1942-45, 1958-66 XIII, 1942-45, 1954-65 XIV, 1942-45, 1958-67 XV, 1942-46, 1951- 52, 1958-66 XVI, 1941-45, 1954-67 XVIII, 1942-45 XVIII Airborne, 1951-63 XIX, 1942-45, 1959-66 XX, 1942-46, 1956-66 XXI, 1941-45, 1957-63 XXII, 1941-45 XXIII, 1943-46 and XXIV, 1944-45.

    338.10.2 Records of subordinate commands

    Textual Records: Unit histories and other records of divisions, brigades, groups, regiments, and miscellaneous army organizations, 1940-70.

    338.11 Records of Support Elements
    1917-92 (bulk 1950-70)

    338.11.1 Records of activities

    Textual Records (reallocated to various record groups): Records of the General Support Maintenance Activity, Loring Air Force Base, ME, 1965 (in Boston). Records of the U.S. Army Medical and Optical Maintenance Activity, St. Louis, MO, 1955-61 (in Kansas City). Records of the Rio Vista Marine Storage Activity, Rio Vista, CA, 1953-61 (in San Francisco). General orders of the U.S. Army Transportation Corps Road Test Support Activity, Ottawa, IL, 1959 (in Chicago). General orders of the Ordnance Field Activity, Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island, IL, 1961 (in Chicago). Unit histories and operating program progress reports of the Lordstown Storage Activity, Warren, OH, 1956-57 (in Chicago). Research and development case and report files, and log, of the General Equipment Test Activity, Fort Lee, VA, 1957-60, 1965 (in Philadelphia). Records (in Philadelphia) of the Curtis Bay, MD, Storage Activity, subdepot of Letterkenny Ordnance Depot, Chambersburg, PA, consisting of general orders, 1951-52, 1954-55 management improvement records, 1952-53 organizational planning records, 1951, 1955 daily journal ("Post Diary"), 1951-57 unit histories, 1917-55 and research and development technical files, 1947-56. Records (in Philadelphia) of the Delaware Storage Activity, Raritan Arsenal, NJ, consisting of general correspondence, 1955 general orders, 1951-52, 1954-55 organizational planning records, 1952, 1955 regulations, 1953 and management improvement records, 1952-53. Issuances of the Hughes Plant Activity, Culver City, CA, 1972-73 (in Los Angeles).

    338.11.2 Records of advisory groups

    Textual Records: Records (in Boston) of U.S. Army Advisory Group, CT, 1957-60, 1962-63 ME, 1958-64 MA, 1957-64 NH, 1951-52, 1957-63 and RI, 1958-64. Issuances (in Chicago) of U.S. Army Advisory Group, IL, 1957-66, 1969 IN, 1957-64 MI, 1957-61 MN, 1957-65 and WI, 1957-60, 1965-66. Records, 1950-64 (in Fort Worth), of U.S. Army Advisory Groups, AR, LA, NM, OK, and TX. Subject files (in Kansas City) of U.S. Army Advisory Group, IA, 1957-63 KS, 1951-52 MO, 1959-63 and NE, 1958-61. General orders of U.S. Army Advisory Group, AZ, 1955-63 (in Los Angeles). General orders (in Philadelphia) of U.S. Army Advisory Group, DE, 1957-61 MD, 1958-62, 1964 PA, 1948-52, 1954, 1958-63 VA, 1957- 65 and WV, 1959.

    338.11.3 Records of agencies

    Textual Records (pre-1962 records reallocated to various record groups, later records reallocated to RG 544): Records (in Los Angeles) of the Los Angeles Procurement Agency, Pasadena, CA, including installation historical records, 1946-69 records concerning investigations, 1959-69 organizational planning records, 1965-69 organization management files, 1966-69 and issuances, 1966-69. Records (in Atlanta) of the Atlanta (GA) District, Southern Region, U.S. Army Audit Agency, consisting of field command operating program records, 1965-66 and issuances, 1960-65. Operating budget records of the U.S. Army Procurement Agency, Chicago, IL, 1966-69 (in Chicago).

    338.11.4 Records of depots

    Textual Records (pre-1962 records reallocated to various record groups, later records reallocated to RG 544): Historical records of the Decatur Signal Depot, Decatur, IL, compiled by the Public Information Office, 1948-61 (in Chicago). Records (in Chicago) of the Lordstown Ordnance Depot, Warren, OH, consisting of installation planning board files, 1946-47, 1951-56 and unit histories, 1956. Records (in Kansas City) of the Sioux Depot, Sidney, NE, consisting of general orders, 1952-62 facilities control records, 1951-57 manuals, 1952-62 newspapers, 1951-52 records concerning operating procedures, 1951-62 organizational planning records, 1952-62 and unit histories, 1954-59. Records (in Kansas City) of the St. Louis (MO) Medical Depot, consisting of conference records, 1952 facilities control records, 1952 installation historical files, 1955 and manuals, 1955. General orders of the 593d Engineer Depot, 1952 (in Kansas City). General correspondence, general orders, organizational planning records, and historical records, 1940-63 (in Seattle), of the Auburn (WA) General Depot 445th Quartermaster Depot, Fort Lawton, WA Mt. Rainier Ordnance Depot, Tacoma, WA Seattle Quartermaster Depot, Seattle, WA and Umatilla Depot, Hermiston, WA.

    338.11.5 Records of hospitals

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 112, in Los Angeles): Records of the Fort Huachuca, AZ, Fort MacArthur, CA, and Fort Irwin, CA, Army Hospitals, 1953- 63.

    338.11.6 Records of laboratories

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 544): Records of the Natick (MA) Laboratory, consisting of mutual weapons development data exchange agreements, 1959-69 management survey case files, 1958-67 technical report record files, 1947-72 historian's background materials, 1941-66 general orders, 1961-69 operating program progress report files, 1944-69 five-year programming files, 1964-68 regulatory publications, 1964-65 operating budget records, 1962-71 a history of the Quartermaster Research and Engineering Field Facility and Quartermaster Test Activity, Maynard, MA, 1960 activation records of the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, 1961-64 research and development project control files, 1952-65, and administrative records, 1956-65 and organizational planning records, 1958-66. Technical reports of the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories, Hanover, NH, 1968-70 (in Boston).

    338.11.7 Records of organizations concerned with prisoner of war and missing in action information

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 389): Subject files of Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 22d U.S. Army Prisoner of War/Civilian Internee Information Center, 1949-74. Records of the U.S. Army Office of Prisoner of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) Affairs, consisting of documents released by the Task Force 250 POW/MIA Documentation Project, 1991-92.

    338.11.8 Records of schools

    Textual Records: Records of the Food Service School, Fort George G. Meade, MD, 1954 (reallocated to RG 92, in Philadelphia). Records of the Medical Service Veterinary School, Chicago, IL, 1957-63 (reallocated to RG 112, in Chicago) and the Fifth Army Area Food Service School, Fort Sheridan, IL, 1951-52 (in Chicago).

    338.11.9 Records of transportation zones

    Textual Records (reallocated to RG 336): Records (in Philadelphia) of the First Transportation Zone, Pittsburgh, PA, consisting of general orders, 1952, 1954, 1956 organizational planning records, 1952, 1954-55 conference files, 1954-55 and unit histories, 1953-55. Central decimal correspondence of the Chief of Transportation, Third Transportation Zone, St. Louis-Kansas City, MO, 1952-56 (in Kansas City).

    338.11.10 Records of other support elements

    Textual Records: Organizational history records of the Army and Engineer Board, U.S. Army Test and Experimentation Command (TEXCOM), 1940-90 (reallocated to RG 553). Security-classified records relating to the destruction of biological weapons at the Pine Bluff Arsenal, AR, 1970-73 (reallocated to RG 544, in Philadelphia). Issuances of the U.S. Army Electronics Support Command, Philadelphia, PA, 1966-68 (reallocated to RG 544, in Philadelphia). International Logistics Program requirements files of the International Logistics Directorate, Philadelphia, PA, 1967-68, 1970 (reallocated to RG 544, in Philadelphia). Correspondence and issuances of the Southwestern Traffic Region, Military Traffic and Terminal Service, 1962-65 (reallocated to RG 552, in Fort Worth).

    Architectural Plans: Arlington Hall Station, Arlington VA, 1942-86, from the Intelligence and Security Command (1,820 items). Yongsan Military Reservation buildings, South Korea, 1952-53, from Headquarters Engineer Construction Group (56 items).

    338.12 Motion Pictures (General)
    1940, 1956, 1975

    Troop maneuvers, training, and other activity at Fort Bliss, TX, ca. 1940 (2 reels). Anniversary events, 601st Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, 1956 (1 reel). Construction and operation of the Refugee Reception Center for Southeast Asian Refugees, Eglin Air Force Base, FL, 1975 (1 reel).

    388.13 Sound Recordings (General)
    1943-45, 1956

    Japanese prisoner of war interviews, 1943-45 (107 items). Interview with Commander, Battery D, 601st Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, part of the Army Hour series, 1956 (1 item).

    338.14 Machine-Readable Records (General)
    1968-70

    Combat Operations Losses and Expenditures Data (COLED-V), 1968- 70, with supporting documentation (6 data sets).

    338.15 Still Pictures (General)
    1986-93

    Posters: U.S. Army recruiting posters, 1986-93 (RP, 50 images).

    Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
    3 volumes, 2428 pages.

    This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


    General Daniel Sultan

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    General Daniel I. Sultan - History

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    Sultan Khan: An Interview with Daniel King

    Sagar Shah: What made you think about writing a book on Sultan Khan? How long did it take you to write the book?

    DK: In 2013, I was contacted by a theatre director who was interested in the story and asked me to do a little research for him. The more I looked into Sultan Khan’s story, the more I realised there was a lot that hadn’t been uncovered, for example, new games and a fascinating political back story. I have many different work commitments and it wasn’t easy to find the time to write. With many stops and starts, the project took me almost seven years.

    SS: As there was hardly any material on him, how did you do the research? What were the sources you referred to, to get the information?

    DK: My main focus of research was looking at contemporary newspapers and chess magazines from the 1920s and 1930s – including Indian newspapers. I managed to access these at the wonderful British Library in London. It was a pleasure working there.

    SS: How would you describe the playing style of Sultan Khan?

    DK: His play was quite uneven as he only learned the western game after the age of 21. He was basically a strategic player. His endgames were good. He was incredibly tenacious, often turning games in his favour, or saving games, after many hours play. However, sometimes he attacked in the most brutal way right from the start – with mixed results.

    SS: Tell us a bit about Sultan Khan, the person. How was he off the chess board?

    DK: He comes across as modest, charming and generous to his opponents. After winning one tournament, a newspaper columnist declared: ‘…there is no more unassuming or popular player.’ Frankly, I would not have spent so many years researching his life if he wasn’t a likeable character!

    Daniel King: Sultan Khan – The Indian Servant Who Became Chess Champion of the British Empire, New in Chess 2020

    SS: How can a man who was brought up with the Indian rules of chess, and with no formal education in the sport, defeat someone as great as Jose Raul Capablanca?

    DK: In that game, Khan managed to reach a closed middlegame position that suited his style perfectly: he manoeuvred brilliantly, shut down counter attacks, and was patient enough to wait for the right moment to break through. Khan mainly learned through experience, by playing, not studying. His first games in England were quite poor, but he learned incredibly quickly. That really shows how talented he was.

    The first time that Sultan Khan played against Capablanca in a simul in 1929

    SS: What were some of the best achievements of Sultan Khan as a chess player?

    DK: He won the British Championship on three occasions: 1929, 1932, 1933. The first half of 1931 was probably the best period for him: he defeated Capablanca at Hastings (although he only came third after throwing away a game against Euwe). He then played Tartakower in a 12-game match defeating him 6½-5½. In the Prague International Team Tournament he scored 11½/17 against many of the leading players of the day, drawing with the World Champion Alekhine and defeating Flohr.

    SS: What were the non-chess (off the board) factors that attributed to the success of Sultan Khan?

    DK: The whole story of how Sultan Khan came to London is extraordinary. In the Punjab, his talent was recognised by Colonel Nawab Sir Umar Hayat Khan – a well-known politician and military leader who was fiercely loyal to the British. He gathered some of the best Indian players of the time to coach Sultan Khan in western chess. In effect Sultan Khan became like a court chess player, a bit like in the days of the Mughal emperors. When Sir Umar travelled to London on a political mission, he brought Sultan Khan with him. There is no doubt in my mind that Sir Umar used Sultan Khan and his chess playing skills as soft diplomacy when they arrived in London: Sir Umar was representing the so-called martial tribes Sultan Khan demonstrated that Indians were the intellectual equals - at the very least - of the British.

    I explore the political background to Sultan Khan’s story in the book – it’s the only way to understand how he was brought to England, and why he returned. I should add that Sultan Khan himself was never involved politically and never offered political opinions. It would not have been his place to do so. His patron – perhaps ‘master’ is a better description – Sir Umar Hayat Khan was the actor in this respect.

    SS: When Sultan came to England and started beating everyone there, what were the political implications like? After all India was being ruled by the British and here is a man who is present in the British land and beating their best players.

    DK: Sultan Khan was popular in Britain! Not just among general chess players but also the national team. I believe he was particularly friendly with the leading British player, Fred Yates, even though they had some great struggles over the chess board. At that time the independence movement in India was gathering tremendous momentum, but that seemed very distant to people in Britain. According to many commentators in Britain at the time, Sultan Khan’s successes ‘strengthened the bonds of Empire’. Of course, this sentiment wasn’t shared by most in India.

    Khan was invited into the British team and, to avoid the controversy of an Indian playing for Britain, with a deft flick of the pen the name was changed to the British Empire Team! I should add that, at that time, India did not field a team in the international team tournaments – which was a source of dissatisfaction to many in India. Khan’s results for the British team were very good.

    SS: Why could Sultan Khan not become the absolute world champion? How did his career end?

    DK: Sultan Khan had some excellent results, but he lacked the consistency of other players. He returned to India at the end of 1933. His patron, Sir Umar Hayat Khan, had been advising the British government at the India Round Table Conferences, but these were over and he wanted to head back to India. Sultan Khan, who was part of his household, simply had no choice but to go with him. But, as I discovered, he also wanted to return. He was frequently ill in Europe – he suffered a lot from colds and flu and even had recurring bouts of malaria – so he was keen to escape the cold climate. More than that, I think he had had enough of performing for his master.

    By the way, there is another member of Sir Umar’s household that we haven’t mentioned yet: Miss Fatima. She learned the rules of the game when she came to London and a year and a half later won the British Ladies Championship with 10½/11 ! This is another remarkable story that I explore in the book.

    SS: Which is your favourite game of Sultan Khan and why?

    DK: His most famous game is naturally his victory over Capablanca in Hastings 1930/31. It is a masterpiece. It shows off his patient, strategic style so well. But this is too well known. He played many fine endgames, but I like his victory against Soultanbeieff from Liege 1930. Khan takes him apart strategically and finishes with a swift attack.

    Here's Sultan Khan's most famous victory of his chess career when he beat Capablanca on 31st of December 1930

    He was a child prodigy and he is surrounded by legends. In his best times he was considered to be unbeatable and by many he was reckoned to be the greatest chess talent of all time: Jose Raul Capablanca, born 1888 in Havana.

    SS: Would you count Sultan Khan as the first great chess player of India?

    This DVD allows you to learn from the example of one of the best players in the history of chess and from the explanations of the authors how to successfully organise your games strategically, consequently how to keep your opponent permanently under press

    DK: Considering that he was the first to challenge western players successfully, I would say yes. By the way, we can say that Sultan Khan was the first Asian player to successfully challenge western players. First, because it is true! Second, because he is claimed by several different countries: he was born and grew up in British India, a country that no longer exists. In 1928 he won the All-India championship. He played most of his chess in Britain and represented the British Empire team. He returned to India, but after independence and partition, he lived out his days in Pakistan. I do not wish to stoke controversy, these are just facts.

    Sultan Khan - born in British India, became the All-India champion in 1928, played most of his chess in Britain and lived out his final days in Pakistan | Photo: New in Chess

    SS: Are you in touch with some family members or relatives of Sultan Khan?

    DK: I’m not in touch with any of Sultan Khan’s family members. I very much hope that one of them sees the book because I wanted to honour his memory. He was a great player, and I think a kind man.

    SS: Who are the people you would like to thank for helping you to write the book?

    DK: There are many people whom I have already thanked for helping me with my research for the book. But let me mention two from India, Manuel Aaron and Vijay Pandit, who kindly supplied me with Indian games that Sultan Khan played. Their marvellous book, Indian Chess History, also provided useful background material on the Indian chess scene. Thank you Sagar for sending it to me! I owe you a Lassi! [Smiles]

    SS: What can youngsters who depend a lot on engines and modern opening preparation learn from this book?

    DK: There is so much we can learn from Sultan Khan, as a person and as a player. As Vishy Anand wrote in his foreword:

    He should serve as an inspiration for chess players from all over India, the sub-continent, and anyone struggling as an outsider against the odds. Coming from a modest background, he took on the greatest in the world and proved that he could match them.

    Even though Khan’s openings were not always the best, he could make up for this with his extraordinary concentration, fighting spirit, and superb endgame technique. These elements can take you far.

    SS: You are a grandmaster, one of the best commentators in the world of chess, a successful chess teacher, an author - what's next on the agenda for you?

    DK: There is no rest for the wicked. I have some recording projects coming up and my latest ChessBase DVD/download that just came out - on the King’s Gambit!

    There's no rest for the wicked!

    Links

    Daniel King: Sultan Khan – The Indian Servant Who Became Chess Champion of the British Empire , New in Chess 2020


    Suleiman and the 70 Weeks of Daniel

    It is a common feature of Double Fulfillment Prophecies that certain key details are not fulfilled in their truest sense till the second fulfillment, that's largely why we know it needs a second. In the case of the 70 weeks we tend to see the 70th alone as what needs something yet future to be fulfilled.

    But given what I argued already about my view of the 70th Week, the implication that perhaps the Walls could be torn down or breached when the Eschatological 70th Week starts is pretty provocative. Since I am expecting the Nisan that starts The Week to include an Islamic conquest of Jerusalem in response to The Temple being rebuilt. And a Decoy Antichrist will kill the true Antichrist who will be heralded as Messiah Ben-Joseph.

    Most people believe if Jerusalem is conquered by a foreign enemy during the 70th Week it's at the midway point, at the same time as the Abomination of Desolation. And I have other reasons for thinking an End Times deception could involve making people think the beginning of The Week was it's middle. It was I think in Nisan that the Walls of Jericho fell.

    People have independently of this seen reasons to look to that range for the end times. Some of those I might get into in future posts. I've offered two possible 70th Week theories on this blog before, neither of which are compatible with this. I'm trying to consider many possibilities.

    Update: It seems the 1535-1538 range is really the time the walls were under construction, though other construction in Jerusalem continued for awhile after, 1541 for the Golden Gate, and then additional renovations after the 1546 Earthquake. Which means the Decree could have likely been Nisan 1535 placing the 70th week as 2018-2025, with the Seventh Trumpet sounding on the First of Tishri in 2021, marking the Mid-Way Point.

    I've come to view the 7 and 62 weeks distinction as that the 7 weeks is how long the construction went on. I know of no documentation that anything was exactly finished in 1584, but it's possible, that's 38 years after the earthquake.

    Also a correction on something I said above, it was April 1st 1969 not 68 reconstruction in the Old City was allowed. I've seen one website suggest that the second fulfillment perhaps switched the order of the 7 weeks and the 62 weeks. I think that's torturing the text a bit, but that it is a full jubilee from then to Nisan 2018 is interesting.

    Update May 2017: If you want to learn more about Suleiman himself in an easy and fun way, I recommend watching Extra History: Suleiman The Magnificent.

    19 comments:

    It seems more plausible to me that the weeks of years would roll according to the secular Jewish calendar, from Tishri through Elul. That would put the midpoint of the tribulation week near the Spring Feasts. Jesus entered triumphant into Jerusalem on the tenth of Nisan, perhaps His counterfeit will want to emulate that idea as well. This consideration would also have Jesus' return aligning with the Fall feasts, which have not yet been fulfilled by Him, as the earlier feasts were.

    I'm aware how popular that assumption is. But I"m aware of no Biblical precedent for the Secular Jewish calendar at all, and indeed only Rabbinic Jews acknowledge it, Karites do not.

    I'm not even convinced of the theory that the year begin with Tishri before the Exodus, even though I like the implication of the Ark landing on the 17th day of the 7th being the same day as the Resurrection, that day falling during Tabernacles could also possibly mean something.

    Hi Jared, about 3 days ago I had the same revelation as you about Daniel 70 week prophecy (although I had not yet come across your website - nor any other raising this point). I came to the conclusion that Daniel's 70 week prophecy is repeating in our day. I arrived at this conclusion by working backwards. I determined that if this was the year of Jubilee and also the year of the Harpazo of the Church - then Daniel's 69 prophetic weeks (Dan 9:24-27) would expire in the year 2018. So then I counted backwards 69 weeks from the year 2018 (69x7=483years) and I arrived in the year 1535AD. When I saw in Wikipedia that Sultan Suleiman of the Ottoman Empire had made "A DECREE" in 1535ad "TO REBUILD THE WALLS OF JERUSALEM" - I realised that this prophecy of Daniel was indeed repeating itself in our time. For this is the same precise language of Daniel 9:25. And so now, if time permits, I will be researching Suleiman the Magnificent and "his decree" so that I may write a short book on this Bible prophecy. For then Christians will know with certainty that there are yet still 7 Years of Great Tribulation on God's timeline to be completed. In 1535ad William Tyndale was arrested for translating the Greek New Testament into English. But by God's divine providence the English NT was printed and distributed only a few months later that same year - all over England and Europe. I find this to be no trivial coincidence as it was the first mass printing "ever" of the English NT in Europe. And the fact that this coincided with Suleiman's decree to rebuild of the Old walls of Jerusalem cannot be left to chance. Perhaps Yosua's point about an additional 7 years being added to the year 2025 is referring to the first Shemita cycle of Christ - when He returns in the year 2025ad to rule and reign on the earth at his Armageddon coming - which also happens to be Israel's 77th Birthday of Independence. God Bless.

    Hi Jared, I forgot to mention that many people were called into ministry in 2011 (7 years ago). And this would explain why Jacob worked 7 years for Rachel (but was immediately deceived by Laban into marrying Leah (the true mother of the Covenant - Judah). And then Jacob having to work another 7 years for Rachel in anguish and bitter lamentation (tribulation). And, it also explains Joseph's seven years of plenty - those called in 2011 to sow and prepare good seed for the harvest in the seven good years (by writing books, articles and recording videos etc - so their works do follow them)to provide for those remaining on the earth in the seven 7 lean years of Great Tribulation to follow.

    Also pointed out in my book which uses the Hebrew holy days to decode The Revelation, there is no evidence that Christ himself will return at the end of the age. This is the common interpretation that also motivates Fundamentalist Christians to wish for and even assist Israel to rebuild their temple as it will lead to the return of the Christ. The prophecies of the Bible are not merely 'dual' they are multi. Jesus said that not all flesh would be destroyed. Was he talking about the events leading up to 70 a.d. or about the near future? The judgment of the earth and the Great White Throne Judgment do not have to be one and the same. In fact the implication is a thousand years in between. Or 365 thousand since to God a day is a thousand years. Also look up the translations for day and week and year in Hebrew. They have multiple meanings. Day also means 'era'. Year also means ' cycle'. Week also means 'Set of seven'.There are 7 of Gods Appointed Times in a year. So Daniels 70 sets of seven can be 70 years, 490 years, 70 Jubilees of the 50 year kind or of the 70 year kind or all of the above as the prophecies repeat. I totally agree however with the partial fulfillment notion that implies it ain't over yet. Antiochus Epiphanes, Caligula, Nero, Christ. All fit the description if The Annointed one (the Messiah). Now we are looking for a ruler who worships walls, is a little horn or a trumpet that blades who speaks boastful things, who does not admire women or the praise of women, who is a man of lies, a lawless one who makes an image walk and talk (TV?). There remain several significant acts not yet done: he will shoot stars down from the sky, and he will change the calendar.We assume the calendar of Israel since that is who the prophecy is about. He will place a talking statue of a foreign God in the Holy of Holies and will abolish the daily sacrifices. Well without the temple there can be no holy of Homies and no sacrifices to abolish. So get ready for a holy war by 2021 if you are right about the years.

    It is also interesting to note that it was the same year, 1535 that the Vatican ordered the famous painting in the Sixtin chapel, representing end times. Very strange. If we add another 7 years period after 2025, we arrive in 2032, exactly 2000 years (or "2 days") from the crucifixion. "The 3rd day He will revive us". Maybe these last 7 years from 2025 to 2032 will be the period of the true tribulation following the false one made so that "even the elects would be deduced if it were possible".

    2025 would be the end of the 70 weeks, including the 70th.

    I've often considered the possibly that the first half of the Week will be mistaken for the second Half.

    I've also considered that the Time of Jcaob's Trouble could total 20 or 21 years.

    That's true, but I don't know if we can count the first 7 years as "trouble":

    "And Jacob served seven years for Rachel and they seemed unto him but a few days, for the love he had to her. (Gen 29:20)

    If we consider this, then there are 13 or 14 years left, or two periods of 7 years, where the last one is really troublesome and shortened, like it is said in Matthew 24:22 that "those days should be shortened. "

    Well if this Hypothesis is true, then things need to go down this Spring. So I'll be paying attention, but I'll be fine if it turns out to be wrong.

    This comment has been removed by the author.

    I have read elsewhere online that Jacob's trouble in fact is not the time when he worked for Laban, but after. it's true that jacob worked hard during these years, but hard working doesn't necessary means "trouble". What happened after these years was more "troubling". During is flight from laban, Jacob's was sandwiched between Laban who chased him from behind, and Esau that came before him with four hundred men. It is written: "Then Jacob was greatly afraid and distressed" (Gen 32:7). That sounds more "troubling" than the previous hard but peaceful years of working for Laban. Maybe both have to be count has "Jacob's troubles".

    According word of God it fulfill
    It's difficulty to caliculatte and imagine

    In my book The Sound of the Trump which is available on Amazon but I intend to revise soon due to more information now, I have marked 2028/29 as the end of the 6000 year age of mans struggle with God. Based on many events including the 50 year Jubilees from the time of Christs ministry beginning( 28/29 a.d.) There will have been 40 of those by the end of 2029 but wait. The first jubilee in Canaan was delayed 7 years. So the date of the 7 years from 2018 to 2025 May be right on the button. It is Nostradamus date for The Great Cateclism. But from 2025 to 29 are probably the dates of the last 3 and 1/2 years of the seven in which the saints wake up and ask "How Long?". Then the Great Tribulation begins all over the world with holy wars and yes, those who call themselves Christians killing Jews Muslims any other faith. After the great tribulation says Christ in Matthew, the sun will grow dark etc. This is now the sixth seal. Now we are faced with another chronological dilemma. One more year as is the common belief? Or another 7 years of astronomical events during the judgment upon the earth? That is the big question. For the decree of 1535 by Suleimon the Magnificent will have been 490 years ago by 2035/36.

    "For the decree of 1535 by Suleimon the Magnificent will have been 490 years ago by 2035/36."

    I think you want to say 2025/26. (Sometimes me too I wish I could edit my posts). I also wonder if the death and resurrection of Christ have not also another 1 day = 1000 years prophetic meaning:
    "After two days will he revive us: in the third day he will raise us up, and we shall live in his sight." (Hos 6:2). That may mean a rapture/second coming sometimes just after 2030.

    Jesus said I come not to destry the law but to fulfill it. The Feast days of Leviticus 23 were a part of the law and as I'm sure most of you reading this know He fulfilled the first four springtime Feast Days so beautifully right on their exact dates.
    The three unfulfilled Feast Dates were in the fall of the year in the Harvest season. What has been growing an is now awaiting Harvest is the church and so the harvesting, the rapture of the church must and will be on a future Feast of trumpets. No other date. God will NOT depart from His divinely pre-set schedule of events. It's the next Feast day and it's fulfillment that nobody seems to want to address. The Day of Atonement know by Judaism as Yom Kippur. We who are reading this do not have to make an atonement. It was done for us on the cross long ago BUT the nation of Israel MUST make an atonement as a nation for having rejected Our Lord on His first incarnation and for all the years since. Jeremiah called it the Time of Jacob's trouble and Zechariah 14 says that two-thirds of the Jews will perish. It will begin with the ceasing of the oblation and sacrifice and the abomination of desolation at the midpoint of the tribulation. Since the fulfillment of the Feast Day MUST occur on it's exact date it will then be on Yom Kippur of the particular year that marks 3 1/2 years in from the beginning of the tribulation. As an example, Yom Kipper, The day of Atonement in 2024 is October 12th. If th rapture occurs on the Feast of Trumpets in 2020, the tribulation begins in 2021, then October 12th would mark the mid point of the tribulation. The final Feast Day, The Feast of Tabernacles, will be fulfilled by the return of Jesus to reclaim the earth from the enemy (with us on white horses behind Him). This is why Zechariah 14 also says that all the nations of the earth must present themselves each year for the 1,000 of the millennial kingdom to commemorate the Feast of tabernacles. Why that particular Feast day? To commemorate the return of Our Lord to planet earth. See how this all works for any of you reading this.

    My position on the Rapture is Mid-Trib.

    Thank you so much for posting the details of the building inscription. I knew the years. But needed to find the evidence to support all that I have found. This is the start date of Daniel's prophecy! Yes, it would be great to have documentation of the year. But since we are in the age of Pisces, the beginning of the year for this information to fit would be 1547. Be blessed. I think He already has.

    95 And there shall be silence in heaven for the space of half an hour and immediately after shall the curtain of heaven be unfolded, as a scroll is unfolded after it is rolled up, and the face of the Lord shall be unveiled

    96 And the saints that are upon the earth, who are alive, shall be quickened and be caught up to meet him.

    97 And they who have slept in their graves shall come forth, for their graves shall be opened and they also shall be caught up to meet him in the midst of the pillar of heaven—

    98 They are Christ’s, the first fruits, they who shall descend with him first, and they who are on the earth and in their graves, who are first caught up to meet him and all this by the voice of the sounding of the trump of the angel of God.

    99 And after this another angel shall sound, which is the second trump and then cometh the redemption of those who are Christ’s at his coming who have received their part in that prison which is prepared for them, that they might receive the gospel, and be judged according to men in the flesh.

    PS This was a great read. I personally believe the timeline is 2018-2025, and that the Trump's won't begin to sound until the event you know as the rapture happens (described in the above scripture). But I'm still tossing up a lot of ideas about that event. I'm not sure those who are raptured will be lifted off the planet until the very end--I wonder if some or all will stay, living in a heightened state having seen the Savior face to face. Just a weird idea I've been having.

    I think mid-point for the tribulation period will be sometime between March and May of this year (2021, and will be marked by some event as described in Revelation 12 after the 1260 day period passes. I'm sure you already know about the sign of Revelation 12: 1-2 happening on September 23, 2017. If you read the entire chapter Revelation 12, it's speculated to be symbolic story denoting a 7 year long period. Just so happens that a month before this sign happened, in Aug 2017 there was a total solar eclipse over the US, and in Apr 2024 (nearly 7 years later) another total solar eclipse will intersect the path of the first, making an X over the heartland of America (specifically missouri) Missouri is a special place to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints according to a revelation claimed by the founding prophet Joseph Smith multiple times in the early history of the church

    I understand there is a lot of literature that has poor things to say about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, but having explored all of its doctrine and principles, it really has a lot of interesting information to be considered, and I'm beginning to wonder how much of the anti-church literature is biased and misled. Hopefully some of this info will aid you in your study of the end times.

    Thanks again for this article, it was an awesome read. (Loved the Dual Prophecy concept, would love to hear more about that.)


    A communist soldier made a daring escape through the Berlin Wall in an APC

    Posted On April 29, 2020 15:41:40

    May Day was a big deal in East Germany. As a matter of fact, it was a big deal in all of the Communist Eastern Bloc countries during the Cold War era. It was, after all, a day for celebrating workers around the world. Since Communist countries were supposed to be a worker’s paradise, it stands to reason they would take a day off from shooting dissenters and waiting in lines to watch a few parades.

    And those parades were lit.

    It was because everyone was preparing for May Day that Wolfgang Engels was able to escape from East Germany.

    The wall began construction in 1961.

    Engels was born in 1943 in Düsseldorf, Germany (what would have been West Germany just a few years later), but his Communist mother took him to East Germany after the end of World War II. As a young man, he was drafted into the Army of the new German Democratic Republic, what we know as East Germany.

    The young soldier was a believer in the new ideology as a young man. He called his upbringing “thorough” and “socialist” and noted his mother even worked for the Stasi. It wasn’t until much later in his service that someone managed to convince him that things were not all they were made out to be.

    But one of his first assignments as a newly-minted East German was to help build the Berlin Wall.

    A Soviet-built East German BTR-152, like the one Wolfgang Engels drove through the Berlin Wall.

    He soon felt terrible about what the wall became. Not just the barrier between the Iron Curtain and Freedom, but a symbol of the ideological struggle of the Cold War — and he was on the wrong side. The GDR was not the Germany he thought he knew.

    After two years, the pressure was getting to him. Suddenly, well before his defection, he was accused of trying to cross the border illegally. He and two friends were looking for a concert in a cafe near the border wall. The group was found and unable to explain, to the guards’ satisfaction, what they were doing and so they were manhandled and mistreated. It drove the reality of East Germany home to him.

    In reality, the thought of crossing the wall hadn’t occurred to him until his East German superiors put the idea in his head. But attempting to flee came with a stiff fine, two years’ jail time, and maybe even a bullet to the head. Still he remained determined — and even asked random passersby to come with him, but no one took him up on the offer.

    His plan to escape was simple enough. He would steal an armored personnel carrier, drive to the most famous wall in the world (at the time at least), and then drive right through it. That’s exactly what he did, but it was nice of him to stop a couple of times and ask if anyone wanted to come.

    The armored personnel carrier came from the preparations being made for the upcoming May Day parade. It was a BTR-152. A six wheeled, Soviet-built vehicle whose top could open upward, luckily for Wolfgang Engels. When the workmen went off to lunch, Engels started up his new vehicle, garnering little notice in a military-run city.

    He had roughly 100 meters — the length of a football field — to gather enough velocity to crash through a single layer of cinder blocks less than ten feet high. Unfortunately, Engels’ APC didn’t fully penetrate the Berlin Wall and he was soon stuck in his vehicle — and stuck in the wall. East German border guards began to open fire on the BTR-152 and Wolfgang Engels. He decided it was time to book it.

    He left the relative safety of the vehicle and tried to climb away. Ensnared in barbed wire, he was shot at close range while attempting to flee. Twice — once in the back and once in the hand. The second bullet tore through his body, in then out.

    Luckily for him, West German police officers from a nearby watchtower fired back at the Eastern border guards, providing much-needed cover and time for Engels. But really, it was time enough for a group of revelers at a nearby bar to come out and help pull him out of the wire and into the freedom of the West. They formed a human ladder, freed him from the wire, and brought him over. They carried his unconscious body back to the bar, closing up the blinds.

    “I came to on top of the counter,” he says. “When I turned my head and saw all the Western brands of liquor on the shelf, I knew that I had made it.”

    Wolfgang Engels was sent by ambulance to a nearby hospital where he recovered from a collapsed lung for three weeks.

    He wouldn’t see his mother again until 1990, after the fall of the wall. He learned the East Germans were planning to abduct him and charge him with desertion before the wall fell. As for the soldier who shot him, Engels is just grateful he didn’t turn his AK-47 on automatic.


    Watch the video: Συγκίνησε ο Στρατηγός Κόρκας στην ομιλία του για τον Ιερό Λόχο (June 2022).


Comments:

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  2. Devry

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  3. Fachnan

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  4. Kulbert

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