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B-17F The Sad Sack

B-17F The Sad Sack


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B-17F The Sad Sack

B-17F The Sad Sack served with the 91st Bombardment Group. She survived to return to the United States in March 1943 to become a training aircraft.

Many thanks to Pen & Sword for providing us with this picture.

US Eighth Air Force in Europe: Eager Eagles 1941-Summer 1943, Martin W. Bowman. A good oral history of the first two years of the Eighth Air Force, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and the formation of the Eighth to July 1943 and Blitz Week. This is the period of early escorted raids and the first raids into Germany, ending before the famous costly raids that proved the need for long range fighters. [read full review]


384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) in World War II

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    (999) (189)
  • 384th During WWII 6270
    • 544th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 602
    • 545th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 568
    • 546th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 1302
    • 547th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 872
    • Support Units 318
    • 384th Bomb Group Lead Crews 223
    • Aircraft 1829
      • B-17E Aircraft 13
      • A-35 Aircraft 4
      • B-17F Aircraft 455
        • B-17F 41-24507 BK*B, "YANKEE RAIDER" 1
        • B-17F 41-24525 SO*Y, "WHAT'S COOKIN' DOC?" 5
        • B-17F 41-24529 BK*J, Unnamed 18
        • B-17F 41-24557 JD*O, "DAMN YANKEE" 6
        • B-17F 41-24560 SU*A, "LITTLE AUDREY" 2
        • B-17F 41-24575 SU*J, "SUNRISE SERENADER" 2
        • B-17F 41-24578 SO*U, "OLD RELIABLE" 26
        • B-17F 42-3024 SU*K, "ROYAL FLUSH" 2
        • B-17F 42-3037 SU*Z, "WINDY CITY AVENGER" 4
        • B-17F 42-3074 JD*B, "LOMA LEE" 5
        • B-17F 42-3075 BK*M, "LONGHORN" 3
        • B-17F 42-3088 SU*G, "SUGAR PUSS" 8
        • B-17F 42-3104 SO*A "RAIDER" 1
        • B-17F 42-3122 JD*N, "APRIL'S FOOL" 4
        • B-17F 42-3218 JD*R, "DORIS MAE" 6
        • B-17F 42-3216 JD*S, "THE JOKER" 1
        • B-17F 42-3222 JD*P,"DUECES WILD" 3
        • B-17F 42-3230 JD*U, "YANKEE POWERHOUSE II" 3
        • B-17F 42-3231 JD*M, "THE INFERNO" 1
        • B-17F 42-3235 JD*T, "LAKANUKI" 1
        • B-17F 42-3259 BK*N/JD*T, "SNAFU"/"ALABAMA WHIRLWIND" 1
        • B-17F 42-3317 XX*X, "SPIRIT OF '76" 3
        • B-17F 42-3429 SU*F, "FLAKHOUSE" 1
        • B-17F 42-3440 SU*B/P, "BROADWAY ROSE" 2
        • B-17F 42-3441, "SPOTTED COW" 16
        • B-17F 42-5051 SU*M, "BARREL HOUSE BESSIE" 3
        • B-17F 42-5086 BK*B, "WAHOO II" 2
        • B-17F 42-5404 JD*M, "GEEZIL" 9
        • B-17F 42-5444 JD*N, "WE DOOD IT" 9
        • B-17F 42-5747 SO*M, "HANGAR QUEEN" 4
        • B-17F 42-5838 SO*P, "MAD MONEY II" 19
        • B-17F 42-5843 SO*S "BLACK GHOST' 4
        • B-17F 42-5848 SO*R, "PATCHES" 9
        • B-17F 42-5849 SO*F, Hell's Belles II 1
        • B-17F 42-5850 SO*M, Unnamed 2
        • B-17F 42-5851 2
        • B-17F 42-5852 SO*T, The Natural 4
        • B-17F 42-5853 SO*U, "SALVAGE QUEEN" 1
        • B-17F 42-5855 JD*V, RAMP TRAMP 1
        • B-17F 42-29529 JD*U, NORA 2 13
        • B-17F 42-29554 JD*Y "BILLIE" 9
        • B-17F 42-29557 SO*S,"YANKEE GAL" 2
        • B-17F 42-29632 JD*K, "Cased Ace" 7
        • B-17F 42-29636 BK*F, "X-VIRGIN" 5
        • B-17F 42-29651 SU*G, "STELLA" 12
        • B-17F 42-29686 SO*B, "PIE-EYED PIPER" 2
        • B-17F 42-29688 SO*S, "KAYO" 2
        • B-17F 42-29699 "OLD BATTLE-AXE", SO*D 2
        • B-17F 42-29717 SU*H/M, "MR FIVE BY FIVE" 3
        • B-17F 42-29723 BK*B, "WOLF PACK" 5
        • B-17F 42-29728 SU*J, "EL RAUNCHO" 12
        • B-17F 42-29733 SU*D, "LOUISIANA PURCHASE" 5
        • B-17F 42-29768 SO*X, "WINSOME WINN II" 15
        • B-17F 42-29784 JD*V, "SMILIN-THRU" 6
        • B-17F 42-29800 BK*H, "ME AN' MY GAL" 4
        • B-17F 42-29809 JD*X, "DAMN YANKEE II" 2
        • B-17F 42-29814 SU*D, "THE DALLAS REBEL" 1
        • B-17F 42-29870 JD*U, "BIG MOOSE" 5
        • B-17F 42-29914 BK*H, Unnamed 4
        • B-17F 42-29927 BK*B, "HOMESICK GAL" 3
        • B-17F 42-29935 BK*K, "PULMADIQUE" 11
        • B-17F 42-29956 SU*B, "VERTICAL SHAFT" 3
        • B -17F 42-29960 SU*J, "NYMOKYMI" 1
        • B-17F 42-30005 BK*A, "SALVAGE QUEEN" 21
        • B-17F 42-30026 BK*J, "BATTLEWAGON" 22
        • B-17F 42-30030 BK-E/F, "OLD IRONSIDES" 3
        • B-17F 42-30031 SU*D, Unnamed 3
        • B-17F 42-30032 BK*D "SKY QUEEN" 9
        • B-17F 42-30033 BK*G, "LITTLE AMERICA" 7
        • B-17F 42-30036 XX*X, Unnamed 1
        • B-17F 42-30037 BK*F, Unnamed 16
        • B-17F 42-30043 SO*V, "RUTHLESS" 14
        • B-17F 42-30046 BK*K & SU*H, "MERRIE HELL" 3
        • B-17F 42-30048 SU*K, "FLAK DANCER" 7
        • B-17F 42-30131 SO*Q, Unnamed 2
        • B-17F 42-30139 JD*O, "SNUFFY" 5
        • B-17F 42-30142 SU*L, "PISTOL PACKIN MAMMA" 5
        • B-17F 42-30145 BK*F, Unnamed 2
        • B-17F 42-30196 BK*Y, "SAD SACK" 5

        The B-17 seemed to be holding formation, he assumed that the pilot, at least, was alive. This American misfit saved his plane & was awarded The Medal of Honor

        Maynard Harrison “Snuffy” Smith was such a screw-up, he joined the US Army to avoid jail. He earned the nickname, “Snuffy Smith,” because no one could stand him, either on base or off of it. That was the polite version. They also called him “Sad Sack”. Despite this, his first mission made him the first living recipient of the Medal of Honor in the European theater (after Jimmy Doolittle in the Pacific), as well as the first enlisted airman to receive it.

        Smith was born to a wealthy family and developed delusions of grandeur. Horrified at what they had produced, his parents sent him to a military academy to fix him, but it did no good. He found work as a tax collector, but when his father died, he quit to live with his mother, retire on his inheritance and give lectures to anyone who’d stand still long enough.

        Which was how he got in trouble. A woman stood still long enough, they got married, had a child, and then he abandoned them. He was 31 years old, and it was 1942, so a judge gave him a choice: pay child support or go to jail. Smith chose the third option: he ran. So they caught him and gave him another choice: go to jail or join the army.

        Smith chose the latter and volunteered to train at the Aerial Gunnery School in Harlingen, Texas where he became a sergeant. After more training at Casper, Wyoming, he became a Staff Sergeant and was sent to Thurleigh, England in March 1943 as part of the 423 rd Squadron, 306 th Bomb Group.

        As soon as they got to Europe, men were put to use right away, but not Smith. No one liked him or wanted to fly with him, so he spent his time at pubs giving locals the benefit of his wisdom and earning another nickname that cannot be published.

        It couldn’t last, of course. The 8th Air Force flew at least two missions a week over the Europe. Their main targets included the German submarine pens at St. Nazaire in Nazi-occupied France. Because of its importance, it was so heavily defended that the Allies started calling it “flak city,” but that wasn’t all.

        The Sperry ball turret of a Royal Air Force B-24.

        To get from their base to St. Nazaire, they first had to fly past Lorient and Brest, which were also heavily defended. Not all on board the planes sent to bomb St. Nazaire made it back alive, and of those who did, many could no longer serve because of their injuries. A flight crew had to trust and work with each other, but no one liked, trusted, or could work with Smith – which was how he avoided action for six weeks.

        On the last day of April, however, Lieutenant Lewis P. Johnson had to pilot his B-17 Flying Fortress with eight other veterans, but it wasn’t enough. They needed another to man the ball turret, and Johnson drew the short straw – he got Smith.

        The Saint-Nazaire submarine base. KaTeznik – CC BY-SA 3.0

        On 1 May 1943, Smith’s squadron flew toward the mainland. They were to rendezvous with other B-17s from the 91st, 303rd, and 305th Bomb Groups – a total of 78 Fortresses to deal with St. Nazaire.

        It didn’t go well. Twenty didn’t make the rendezvous and had to speed up, the strain of which forced five to return to base. Mechanical problems forced another six bombers back while the bad weather made another 38 do the same. That left only 29.

        A B-17F of the 99th Bomb Group, with the nearly frameless clear-view bombardier’s nose.

        It was enough. They dropped their bombs then veered off toward the Atlantic. Enemy planes took to the air, but they were too late as the bombers managed to elude them by flying into a large cloud bank. The Allies sighed in relief. They’d suffered no losses as they made their way back to Britain. Or so they thought.

        However, in the cloud bank, the lead navigator made a mistake by turning east too early. They were still flying over France’s northwestern peninsula, a trajectory that took them directly to Brest. The Germans greeted them with flak from the ground, and while their planes had been too slow to respond at St. Nazaire, Brest was another matter.

        “Combat boxes” of 12 B-17 during bombing missions. Anynobody – CC BY-SA 3.0

        As many as 20 enemy fighters attacked the formation, and two Fortresses were shot out of the sky, so Johnson dropped his bomber to avoid the oncoming enemy fighters as Smith began firing back. Their B-17 was hit by 20mm cannon fire but managed to steer toward the English Channel before an enemy pilot got lucky.

        An explosion rocked the plane. Communications went down controls went haywire, Technical Sergeant William W. Fahrenhold who was in the cockpit was ordered by Johnson to check out the damage. He opened the door to see what he could do. He couldn’t do anything. The central part of the plane was on fire, so he shut the door again. Johnson, Fahrenhold, and 1st Lieutenant Robert McCallum (the copilot) were trapped and couldn’t communicate with the rest of the crew.

        The holes in the radio operator’s compartment.

        The ball turret didn’t work either, but Smith managed to climb out to find the radio compartment and the center section of the plane on fire. Radioman Harry Bean ran past him with a parachute and jumped out over the channel. Waist gunners Joseph Bukacek and Robert Folliard did the same.

        He was isolated from the crew up front and at first did not know whether they had bailed out or been killed, but since the B-17 seemed to be holding formation, he assumed that the pilot, at least, was alive and at the controls.

        Wrapping his sweater around his face, Smith grabbed a fire extinguisher and took care of the radio room… just as Roy Gibson, the tail gunner, crawled out of the burning tail toward him. Smith dragged him away and saw that he had been shot in the back. He rolled the man over to keep him from drowning in his own blood, gave him a shot of morphine, and went back to work on the radio room fire till he was interrupted by a Focke Wulf 190 lining up for a shot.

        Staff Sergeant Maynard Smith of the 306th Bombardment Group, is presented with the Medal of Honor by Secretary of War Henry L Stimson in front of a B-17 Flying Fortress at Thurleigh Airfield, USAAF Station 111, England.

        Dropping the extinguisher, Smith fired 50-caliber rounds at the enemy plane. It veered off, leaving him to get back to the fire. Seeing a large hole in the fuselage, he jumped into the room and began throwing the burning debris out of the plane. Then ammunition boxes began exploding, so he threw those out, too.

        But another plane attacked them, so again he ran to the waist gun, fired, then returned to the fire until the extinguisher was empty. He then used the contents of a water bottle, the contents of a urine bottle, and finally unzipped his pants. But he didn’t have enough juice, either.

        Desperate, he began hitting the flames with his hands and feet till his clothes smoldered, but that did no good either. Then another enemy fighter dove on them. Smith had had enough. Running to the waist gun for the third time he managed to score several hits on the enemy plane, then went back to the fire till Gibson groaned.

        Secretary of War Stimson attaching the Medal of Honor on Smith.

        He spent the next hour and a half tending to the man, shooting at German planes, and finally managing to put out the fire which had burned so hot that metal had melted. Fearing that the heat had weakened the B-17’s fuselage, he threw out everything in the rear of the plane that wasn’t too hot, too heavy, or bolted down.

        Johnson got them back to base, but the landing was the last straw. The plane broke in two.

        Smith’s bomber had been hit with more than 3,500 bullets and pieces of shrapnel.

        Except for the three who jumped, they all lived. They let Smith fly more missions, but he still wasn’t liked, and his attitude hadn’t improved. When he was late for a mission because he had stayed out too late, he was punished with kitchen duty.

        His awarding ceremony was great, however. President Franklin Roosevelt understood the PR value of the event, so full military honors were prepared. Even Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson flew out to give Smith his Medal of Honor, but nobody bothered to tell Smith about it. They found him in the kitchen doing cleaning work.


        Group History

        Note: Boeing built aircraft numbered from 231932 and including 232000s, 297058 to 297407, 2102000s, 337000s, 338000s and 339000s.

        Douglas built aircraft numbered from 2106984 and including 2107000s, 46000s, and 485000s.

        Vega (Lockheed) built aircraft numbered from 297436 and including 298000s, 48000s, and 485000s.

        Type Manufacturer Serial No # Range
        Y1B-17 Boeing 36-149/36-161
        Y1B-17A Boeing 37-369
        B-17B Boeing 38-211/35-220
        B-17B Boeing 38-221/38-223
        B-17B Boeing 38-258/38-270
        B-17B Boeing 38-583/38-584
        B-17B Boeing 38-610
        B-17B Boeing 39-1/39-10
        B-17C Boeing 40-2042/40-2079
        B-17D Boeing 40-3059/40-3100
        B-17E Boeing 41-2393/41-2669
        B-17E Boeing 41-9011/41-9245
        B-7F-1 Boeing 41-24340/41-24389
        B-17F-5 Boeing 41-24390/41-24439
        B-17F-10 Boeing 41-24440/41-24489
        B-17F-15 Boeing 41-24490/41-24503
        B-17F-20 Boeing 41-24504/41-24539
        B-17F-25 Boeing 41-24540/41-24584
        B-17F-27 Boeing 41-24585/41-24639
        B-17F-1 Douglas 42-2964/42-2966
        B-17F-5 Douglas 42-2967/42-2979
        B-17F-10 Douglas 42-2979/42-3003
        B-17F-15 Douglas 42-3004/42-3038
        B-17F-20 Douglas 42-3039/42-3073
        B-17F-25 Douglas 42-3074/42-3148
        B-17F-30 Douglas 42-3149/42-3188
        B-17F-35 Douglas 42-3189/42-3228
        B-17F-40 Douglas 42-3229/42-3283
        B-17F-45 Douglas 42-3284/42-3338
        B-17F-50 Douglas 42-3339/42-3393
        B-17F-55 Douglas 42-3394/42-3422
        B-17F- Douglas 42-3423/42-3448
        B-17F-65 Douglas 42-3449/42-3482
        B-17F-70 Douglas 42-3483/42-3503
        B-17F-75 Douglas 42-3504/42-3562
        B-17G-5 Douglas 42-3563
        B-17F-30 Boeing 42-5050/42-5078
        B-17F-35 Boeing 42-5079/42-5149
        B-17F-40 Boeing 42-5150/42-5249
        B-17F-45 Boeing 42-5250/42-5349
        B-17F-50 Boeing 42-5350/42-5484
        B-17F-1 Vega 42-5705/42-5709
        Type Manufacturer Serial No # Range
        B-17F-5 Vega 42-5710/42-5724
        B-17F-10 Vega 42-5725/42-5744
        B-17F-15 Vega 42-5748/42-5764
        B-17F-20 Vega 42-5765/42-5804
        B-17F-25 Vega 42-5805/42-5854
        B-17F-30 Vega 42-5855/42-5904
        B-17F-35 Vega 42-5905/42-5954
        B-17F-40 Vega 42-5955/42-6029
        B-17F-45 Vega 42-6030/42-6104
        B-17F-50 Vega 42-6105/42-6204
        B-17F-55 Boeing 42-29467/42-29531
        B-17F-60 Boeing 42-29532/42-29631
        B-17F-65 Boeing 42-29632/42-29731
        B-17F-70 Boeing 42-29732/42-29831
        B-17F-75 Boeing 42-29832/42-29931
        B-17F-80 Boeing 42-29932/42-30031
        B-17F-85 Boeing 42-30032/42-30131
        B-17F-90 Boeing 42-30132/42-30231
        B-17F-95 Boeing 42-30232/42-30331
        B-17F-100 Boeing 42-30332/42-30431
        B-17F-105 Boeing 42-30432/42-30531
        B-17F-110 Boeing 42-30532/42-30616
        B-17F-115 Boeing 42-30617/42-30731
        B-17F-120 Boeing 42-30732/42-30831
        B-17F-125 Boeing 42-30832/42-30931
        B-17F-130 Boeing 42-30932/42-31031
        B-17G-1 Boeing 42-31032/42-31131
        B-17G-5 Boeing 42-31132/42-31231
        B-17G-10 Boeing 42-31232/42-31331
        B-17G-15 Boeing 42-31332/42-31431
        B-17G-20 Boeing 42-31432/42-31631
        B-17G-25 Boeing 42-31632/42-31731
        B-17G-30 Boeing 42-31732/42-31931
        B-17G-35 Boeing 42-31932/42-32116
        B-17F-80 Douglas 42-37714/42-37715
        B-17G-10 Douglas 42-37716
        B-17F-80 Douglas 42-37717/42-37720
        B-17G-10 Douglas 42-37721/42-37803
        B-17G-15 Douglas 42-37804/42-37893
        B-17G-20 Douglas 42-37894/42-37988
        B-17G-25 Douglas 42-37989/42-38083
        B-17G-30 Douglas 42-38084/42-38213
        Type Manufacturer Serial No # Range
        B-17G-1 Vega 42-39758/42-39857
        B-17G-5 Vega 42-39858/42-39957
        B-17G-10 Vega 42-39958/42-40057
        B-17G-40 Boeing 42-97058/42-97172
        B-17G-45 Boeing 42-97173/42-97407
        B-17G-15 Vega 42-97436/42-97535
        B-17G-20 Vega 42-97536/42-97635
        B-17G-25 Vega 42-97636/42-97735
        B-17G-30 Vega 42-97736/42-97835
        B-17G-35 Vega 42-97836/42-97935
        B-17G-40 Vega 42-97936/42-98035
        B-17G-50 Boeing 42-102379/42-102543
        B-17G-55 Boeing 42-102544/42-102743
        B-17G-60 Boeing 42-102744/42-102978
        B-17G-35 Douglas 42-106984/42-107233
        B-17G-65 Boeing 43-37509/43-37673
        B-17G-70 Boeing 43-37674/43-37873
        B-17G-75 Boeing 43-37874/43-38073
        B-17G-80 Boeing 43-38074/43-38273
        B-17G-85 Boeing 43-38274/43-38473
        B-17G-90 Boeing 43-38474/43-38673
        B-17G-95 Boeing 43-38674/43-38873
        B-17G-100 Boeing 43-38874/43-39073
        B-17G-105 Boeing 43-39074/43-39273
        B-17G-110 Boeing 43-39274/43-39508
        B-17G-40 Douglas 44-6001/44-6125
        B-17G-45 Douglas 44-6126/44-6250
        B-17G-50 Douglas 44-6251/44-6500
        B-17G-55 Douglas 44-6501/44-6625
        B-17G-60 Douglas 44-6626/44-6750
        B-17G-65 Douglas 44-6751/44-6875
        B-17G-70 Douglas 44-6876/44-7000
        B-17G-45 Vega 44-8001/44-8100
        B-17G-50 Vega 44-8101/44-8200
        B-17G-55 Vega 44-8201/44-8300
        B-17G-60 Vega 44-8301/44-8400
        B-17G-65 Vega 44-8401/44-8500
        B-17G-70 Vega 44-8501/44-8600
        B-17G-75 Vega 44-8601/44-8700
        B-17G-80 Vega 44-8701/44-8800
        B-17G-85 Vega 44-8801/44-8900
        B-17G-90 Vega 44-8901/44-9000
        Type Manufacturer Serial No # Range
        B-17G-75 Douglas 44-83236/44-83360
        B-17G-80 Douglas 44-83361/44-83485
        B-17G-85 Douglas 44-83486/44-83585
        B-17G-90 Douglas 44-83586/44-83685
        B-17G-95 Douglas 44-83686/44-83863
        B-17G-95 Douglas 44-83864/44-83885
        B-17G-95 Vega 44-85492/44-85591
        B-17G-100 Vega 44-85592/44-85691
        B-17G-105 Vega 44-85692/44-85791
        B-17G-110 Vega 44-85792/44-85841
        The manufacturer of the following B-17's is unknown. It assumed that those manufactured prior to 1942 were made by The Boeing Aircraft Company. pw
        36-149/36161
        37-369
        38-211/38-223
        38-258/38-270
        38-583/38-584
        38-610
        39-1/39-10
        40-2042/402079
        40-3059/40/3100
        41-2393/41-2669
        41-9011/41-9245
        41-23340/41-24639
        42-2964/423563
        42-5050/42-5484
        42-5705/42-6204
        42-29467/42-32116
        42-37714/42-38213
        42-39758/42-40057
        42-97058/42-97407
        42-97436/42-98035
        42-102379/42-102978
        42-106984/42-107233
        43-37590/43-39508
        44-6001/44-7000
        44-8001/44-9000
        44-83236/44-83885
        44-85492/44-85841

        These Productions Blocks and Serial numbers are from B-17 Flying Fortress in Detail & Scale. by A.T. Lloyd & T.D. Moore and were supplied to the 100th by the Polish Historian Michal Mucha of Poznan, Poland. (pw)

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        This website was made possible thanks to generous contributions from 100th Bomb Group Veterans G. Duane "Bud" Vieth and Grant A. Fuller.


        B-17F The Sad Sack - History

        According to our records Pennsylvania was his home or enlistment state and Allegheny County included within the archival record. We have Pittsburgh listed as the city. He had enlisted in the United States Army Air Forces. Served during World War II. McClean had the rank of Staff Sergeant. His military occupation or specialty was Ball Turret Gunner. Service number assignment was 33288805. Attached to 384th Bomber Group, Heavy, 546th Bomber Squadron. During his service in World War II, Army Air Forces Staff Sergeant McClean experienced a traumatic event which ultimately resulted in loss of life on October 14, 1943 . Recorded circumstances attributed to: KIA - Killed in Action. Incident location: Bavaria, Germany.

        SSGT Harold K. McClean worked for the Union Railroad. He entered the US Army Air Corps on August 29, 1942. He was married to Virginia McClean and they had a son together.

        Their 2nd mission flown against the ball bearing industry at Schweinfurt, Germany was disastrous and came to be known as Black Thursday. Bad weather and lack of range of the P-47 escort aircraft meant that they had to go it alone for much of the mission .

        In the course of 4 days in October 1943, the Mighty Eighth lost 90 crews and aircraft. The loss rates stunned higher command and finally convinced them that the Flying Fortress while very formidable was not fully capable of conducting raids deep into German without adequate fighter support.

        Their B-17 #42-30196 "Sad Sack" was among those lost, along with 6 of the crew of 10 killed or missing.

        Harold Keith McClean is buried or memorialized at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lemay, St. Louis County, Missouri. This is a National American Cemetery administered through the Department of Veteran's Affairs.

        The Misfit Who, On His First Mission, Became the First Enlisted Airman To Receive a Medal of Honor

        Maynard Harrison “Snuffy” Smith was such a screw-up, he joined the US Army to avoid jail. He earned the nickname, “Snuffy Smith,” because no one could stand him, either on base or off of it. That was the polite version. They also called him “Sad Sack”. Despite this, his <em>first</em> mission made him the first living recipient of the Medal of Honor in the European theater (after Jimmy Doolittle in the Pacific), as well as the first enlisted airman to receive it.

        Smith was born to a wealthy family and developed delusions of grandeur. Horrified at what they had produced, his parents sent him to a military academy to fix him, but it did no good. He found work as a tax collector, but when his father died, he quit to live with his mother, retire on his inheritance and give lectures to anyone who’d stand still long enough.

        Which was how he got in trouble. A woman stood still long enough, they got married, had a child, and then he abandoned them. He was 31 years old, and it was 1942, so a judge gave him a choice: pay child support or go to jail. Smith chose the third option: he ran. So they caught him and gave him another choice: go to jail or join the army.

        Smith chose the latter and volunteered to train at the Aerial Gunnery School in Harlingen, Texas where he became a sergeant. After more training at Casper, Wyoming, he became a Staff Sergeant and was sent to Thurleigh, England in March 1943 as part of the 423<sup>rd</sup> Squadron, 306<sup>th</sup> Bomb Group.

        As soon as they got to Europe, men were put to use right away, but not Smith. No one liked him or wanted to fly with him, so he spent his time at pubs giving locals the benefit of his wisdom and earning another nickname that cannot be published.

        It couldn’t last, of course. The 8th Air Force flew at least two missions a week over the Europe. Their main targets included the German submarine pens at St. Nazaire in Nazi-occupied France. Because of its importance, it was so heavily defended that the Allies started calling it “flak city,” but that wasn’t all.

        <a href=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Air_Ministry_Second_World_War_Official_Collection_CI1028.jpg”><img size-large” title=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_turret” src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Air_Ministry_Second_World_War_Official_Collection_CI1028-640𴦰.jpg” alt=”The Sperry ball turret of a Royal Air Force B-24″ width=�″ height=�″ /></a> The Sperry ball turret of a Royal Air Force B-24.

        To get from their base to St. Nazaire, they first had to fly past Lorient and Brest, which were also heavily defended. Not all on board the planes sent to bomb St. Nazaire made it back alive, and of those who did, many could no longer serve because of their injuries. A flight crew had to trust and work with each other, but no one liked, trusted, or could work with Smith – which was how he avoided action for six weeks.

        On the last day of April, however, Lieutenant Lewis P. Johnson had to pilot his B-17 Flying Fortress with eight other veterans, but it wasn’t enough. They needed another to man the ball turret, and Johnson drew the short straw – he got Smith.

        <a href=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/1280px-Base_ssmarin_stnazaire.jpg”><img size-large” title=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-Nazaire_submarine_base” src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/1280px-Base_ssmarin_stnazaire-640𴤦.jpg” alt=”The Saint-Nazaire submarine base” width=�″ height=�″ /></a> The Saint-Nazaire submarine base. KaTeznik – CC BY-SA 3.0

        On 1 May 1943, Smith’s squadron flew toward the mainland. They were to rendezvous with other B-17s from the 91st, 303rd, and 305th Bomb Groups – a total of 78 Fortresses to deal with St. Nazaire.

        It didn’t go well. Twenty didn’t make the rendezvous and had to speed up, the strain of which forced five to return to base. Mechanical problems forced another six bombers back while the bad weather made another 38 do the same. That left only 29.

        <img wp-image-250789″ src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/boeing_b-17f_42-29513_in_flight_1943-640𴥦.jpg” alt=”A B-17F of the 99th Bomb Group, with the nearly frameless clear-view bombardier’s nose.” width=�″ height=�″ /> A B-17F of the 99th Bomb Group, with the nearly frameless clear-view bombardier’s nose.

        It was enough. They dropped their bombs then veered off toward the Atlantic. Enemy planes took to the air, but they were too late as the bombers managed to elude them by flying into a large cloud bank. The Allies sighed in relief. They’d suffered no losses as they made their way back to Britain. Or so they thought.

        However, in the cloud bank, the lead navigator made a mistake by turning east too early. They were still flying over France’s northwestern peninsula, a trajectory that took them directly to Brest. The Germans greeted them with flak from the ground, and while their planes had been too slow to respond at St. Nazaire, Brest was another matter.

        <img wp-image-250792″ src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/1200px-combatbox-640𴤼.gif” alt=”&quotCombat boxes&quot of 12 B-17 during bombing missions. Image Credit.” width=�″ height=�″ /> “Combat boxes” of 12 B-17 during bombing missions. Anynobody – CC BY-SA 3.0

        As many as 20 enemy fighters attacked the formation, and two Fortresses were shot out of the sky, so Johnson dropped his bomber to avoid the oncoming enemy fighters as Smith began firing back. Their B-17 was hit by 20mm cannon fire but managed to steer toward the English Channel before an enemy pilot got lucky.

        An explosion rocked the plane. Communications went down controls went haywire, Technical Sergeant William W. Fahrenhold who was in the cockpit was ordered by Johnson to check out the damage. He opened the door to see what he could do. He couldn’t do anything. The central part of the plane was on fire, so he shut the door again. Johnson, Fahrenhold, and 1st Lieutenant Robert McCallum (the copilot) were trapped and couldn’t communicate with the rest of the crew.

        <a href=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Boeing-B-17F-65-BO-42-29649-battle-damage.png”><img size-large” title=”http://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/maynard-harrison-smith/” src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Boeing-B-17F-65-BO-42-29649-battle-damage-640𴧦.png” alt=”The holes in the radio operator’s compartment that Smith chucked burning debris out of” width=�″ height=�″ /></a> The holes in the radio operator’s compartment.

        The ball turret didn’t work either, but Smith managed to climb out to find the radio compartment and the center section of the plane on fire. Radioman Harry Bean ran past him with a parachute and jumped out over the channel. Waist gunners Joseph Bukacek and Robert Folliard did the same.

        He was isolated from the crew up front and at first did not know whether they had bailed out or been killed, but since the B-17 seemed to be holding formation, he assumed that the pilot, at least, was alive and at the controls.

        Wrapping his sweater around his face, Smith grabbed a fire extinguisher and took care of the radio room… just as Roy Gibson, the tail gunner, crawled out of the burning tail toward him. Smith dragged him away and saw that he had been shot in the back. He rolled the man over to keep him from drowning in his own blood, gave him a shot of morphine, and went back to work on the radio room fire till he was interrupted by a Focke Wulf 190 lining up for a shot.

        <img wp-image-250798″ src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/raf_thurleigh_-_306th_bombardment_group_-_moh_ceremony_maynard_smith-640𴥤.jpg” alt=”Staff Sergeant Maynard Smith of the 306th Bombardment Group, is presented with the Medal of Honor by Secretary of War Henry L Stimson in front of a B-17 Flying Fortress at Thurleigh Airfield, USAAF Station 111, England.” width=�″ height=�″ /> Staff Sergeant Maynard Smith of the 306th Bombardment Group, is presented with the Medal of Honor by Secretary of War Henry L Stimson in front of a B-17 Flying Fortress at Thurleigh Airfield, USAAF Station 111, England.

        Dropping the extinguisher, Smith fired 50-caliber rounds at the enemy plane. It veered off, leaving him to get back to the fire. Seeing a large hole in the fuselage, he jumped into the room and began throwing the burning debris out of the plane. Then ammunition boxes began exploding, so he threw those out, too.

        But another plane attacked them, so again he ran to the waist gun, fired, then returned to the fire until the extinguisher was empty. He then used the contents of a water bottle, the contents of a urine bottle, and finally unzipped his pants. But he didn’t have enough juice, either.

        Desperate, he began hitting the flames with his hands and feet till his clothes smoldered, but that did no good either. Then another enemy fighter dove on them. Smith had had enough. Running to the waist gun for the third time he managed to score several hits on the enemy plane, then went back to the fire till Gibson groaned.

        <a href=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Medal-of-Honor-SMITH-Maynard-Harrison-Staff-Sergeant-USAAF.png”><img size-large” title=”http://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/maynard-harrison-smith/” src=”https://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Medal-of-Honor-SMITH-Maynard-Harrison-Staff-Sergeant-USAAF-630𴩘.png” alt=”Secretary of War Stimson attaching the Medal of Honor on Smith” width=�″ height=�″ /></a> Secretary of War Stimson attaching the Medal of Honor on Smith.

        He spent the next hour and a half tending to the man, shooting at German planes, and finally managing to put out the fire which had burned so hot that metal had melted. Fearing that the heat had weakened the B-17’s fuselage, he threw out everything in the rear of the plane that wasn’t too hot, too heavy, or bolted down.

        Johnson got them back to base, but the landing was the last straw. The plane broke in two.

        Smith’s bomber had been hit with more than 3,500 bullets and pieces of shrapnel.

        Except for the three who jumped, they all lived. They let Smith fly more missions, but he still wasn’t liked, and his attitude hadn’t improved. When he was late for a mission because he had stayed out too late, he was punished with kitchen duty.

        His awarding ceremony was great, however. President Franklin Roosevelt understood the PR value of the event, so full military honors were prepared. Even Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson flew out to give Smith his Medal of Honor, but nobody bothered to tell Smith about it. They found him in the kitchen doing cleaning work.


        384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) in World War II

        Welcome to the 384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Photo Gallery. This gallery makes available the photographic and documentary portion of the 384th BG record. All content on this gallery is visible to all visitors. Those wishing to enter a comment or contribute images will need to register and log in (links at left of Home page). Please register for an account when you need access beyond viewing gallery content. For additional information about the 384th BG, visit the 384th Bomb Group website⇗.

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          (999) (189)
        • 384th During WWII 6270
          • 544th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 602
          • 545th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 568
          • 546th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 1302
          • 547th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 872
          • Support Units 318
          • 384th Bomb Group Lead Crews 223
          • Aircraft 1829
            • B-17E Aircraft 13
            • A-35 Aircraft 4
            • B-17F Aircraft 455
              • B-17F 41-24507 BK*B, "YANKEE RAIDER" 1
              • B-17F 41-24525 SO*Y, "WHAT'S COOKIN' DOC?" 5
              • B-17F 41-24529 BK*J, Unnamed 18
              • B-17F 41-24557 JD*O, "DAMN YANKEE" 6
              • B-17F 41-24560 SU*A, "LITTLE AUDREY" 2
              • B-17F 41-24575 SU*J, "SUNRISE SERENADER" 2
              • B-17F 41-24578 SO*U, "OLD RELIABLE" 26
              • B-17F 42-3024 SU*K, "ROYAL FLUSH" 2
              • B-17F 42-3037 SU*Z, "WINDY CITY AVENGER" 4
              • B-17F 42-3074 JD*B, "LOMA LEE" 5
              • B-17F 42-3075 BK*M, "LONGHORN" 3
              • B-17F 42-3088 SU*G, "SUGAR PUSS" 8
              • B-17F 42-3104 SO*A "RAIDER" 1
              • B-17F 42-3122 JD*N, "APRIL'S FOOL" 4
              • B-17F 42-3218 JD*R, "DORIS MAE" 6
              • B-17F 42-3216 JD*S, "THE JOKER" 1
              • B-17F 42-3222 JD*P,"DUECES WILD" 3
              • B-17F 42-3230 JD*U, "YANKEE POWERHOUSE II" 3
              • B-17F 42-3231 JD*M, "THE INFERNO" 1
              • B-17F 42-3235 JD*T, "LAKANUKI" 1
              • B-17F 42-3259 BK*N/JD*T, "SNAFU"/"ALABAMA WHIRLWIND" 1
              • B-17F 42-3317 XX*X, "SPIRIT OF '76" 3
              • B-17F 42-3429 SU*F, "FLAKHOUSE" 1
              • B-17F 42-3440 SU*B/P, "BROADWAY ROSE" 2
              • B-17F 42-3441, "SPOTTED COW" 16
              • B-17F 42-5051 SU*M, "BARREL HOUSE BESSIE" 3
              • B-17F 42-5086 BK*B, "WAHOO II" 2
              • B-17F 42-5404 JD*M, "GEEZIL" 9
              • B-17F 42-5444 JD*N, "WE DOOD IT" 9
              • B-17F 42-5747 SO*M, "HANGAR QUEEN" 4
              • B-17F 42-5838 SO*P, "MAD MONEY II" 19
              • B-17F 42-5843 SO*S "BLACK GHOST' 4
              • B-17F 42-5848 SO*R, "PATCHES" 9
              • B-17F 42-5849 SO*F, Hell's Belles II 1
              • B-17F 42-5850 SO*M, Unnamed 2
              • B-17F 42-5851 2
              • B-17F 42-5852 SO*T, The Natural 4
              • B-17F 42-5853 SO*U, "SALVAGE QUEEN" 1
              • B-17F 42-5855 JD*V, RAMP TRAMP 1
              • B-17F 42-29529 JD*U, NORA 2 13
              • B-17F 42-29554 JD*Y "BILLIE" 9
              • B-17F 42-29557 SO*S,"YANKEE GAL" 2
              • B-17F 42-29632 JD*K, "Cased Ace" 7
              • B-17F 42-29636 BK*F, "X-VIRGIN" 5
              • B-17F 42-29651 SU*G, "STELLA" 12
              • B-17F 42-29686 SO*B, "PIE-EYED PIPER" 2
              • B-17F 42-29688 SO*S, "KAYO" 2
              • B-17F 42-29699 "OLD BATTLE-AXE", SO*D 2
              • B-17F 42-29717 SU*H/M, "MR FIVE BY FIVE" 3
              • B-17F 42-29723 BK*B, "WOLF PACK" 5
              • B-17F 42-29728 SU*J, "EL RAUNCHO" 12
              • B-17F 42-29733 SU*D, "LOUISIANA PURCHASE" 5
              • B-17F 42-29768 SO*X, "WINSOME WINN II" 15
              • B-17F 42-29784 JD*V, "SMILIN-THRU" 6
              • B-17F 42-29800 BK*H, "ME AN' MY GAL" 4
              • B-17F 42-29809 JD*X, "DAMN YANKEE II" 2
              • B-17F 42-29814 SU*D, "THE DALLAS REBEL" 1
              • B-17F 42-29870 JD*U, "BIG MOOSE" 5
              • B-17F 42-29914 BK*H, Unnamed 4
              • B-17F 42-29927 BK*B, "HOMESICK GAL" 3
              • B-17F 42-29935 BK*K, "PULMADIQUE" 11
              • B-17F 42-29956 SU*B, "VERTICAL SHAFT" 3
              • B -17F 42-29960 SU*J, "NYMOKYMI" 1
              • B-17F 42-30005 BK*A, "SALVAGE QUEEN" 21
              • B-17F 42-30026 BK*J, "BATTLEWAGON" 22
              • B-17F 42-30030 BK-E/F, "OLD IRONSIDES" 3
              • B-17F 42-30031 SU*D, Unnamed 3
              • B-17F 42-30032 BK*D "SKY QUEEN" 9
              • B-17F 42-30033 BK*G, "LITTLE AMERICA" 7
              • B-17F 42-30036 XX*X, Unnamed 1
              • B-17F 42-30037 BK*F, Unnamed 16
              • B-17F 42-30043 SO*V, "RUTHLESS" 14
              • B-17F 42-30046 BK*K & SU*H, "MERRIE HELL" 3
              • B-17F 42-30048 SU*K, "FLAK DANCER" 7
              • B-17F 42-30131 SO*Q, Unnamed 2
              • B-17F 42-30139 JD*O, "SNUFFY" 5
              • B-17F 42-30142 SU*L, "PISTOL PACKIN MAMMA" 5
              • B-17F 42-30145 BK*F, Unnamed 2
              • B-17F 42-30196 BK*Y, "SAD SACK" 5

              384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) in World War II

              Welcome to the 384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Photo Gallery. This gallery makes available the photographic and documentary portion of the 384th BG record. All content on this gallery is visible to all visitors. Those wishing to enter a comment or contribute images will need to register and log in (links at left of Home page). Please register for an account when you need access beyond viewing gallery content. For additional information about the 384th BG, visit the 384th Bomb Group website⇗.

              Guidance on contributing images can be obtained by downloading this PDF document: Upload Instructions &dArr

              ATTENTION: DUE TO PROBLEMS IN THE LATEST UPDATE, YOU MUST LOG IN TO SEE THE GALLERY CONTENTS - CREATE AN ACCOUNT IF NECESSARY.

                (999) (189)
              • 384th During WWII 6270
                • 544th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 602
                • 545th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 568
                • 546th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 1302
                • 547th Bomb Squadron (Heavy) 872
                • Support Units 318
                • 384th Bomb Group Lead Crews 223
                • Aircraft 1829
                  • B-17E Aircraft 13
                  • A-35 Aircraft 4
                  • B-17F Aircraft 455
                    • B-17F 41-24507 BK*B, "YANKEE RAIDER" 1
                    • B-17F 41-24525 SO*Y, "WHAT'S COOKIN' DOC?" 5
                    • B-17F 41-24529 BK*J, Unnamed 18
                    • B-17F 41-24557 JD*O, "DAMN YANKEE" 6
                    • B-17F 41-24560 SU*A, "LITTLE AUDREY" 2
                    • B-17F 41-24575 SU*J, "SUNRISE SERENADER" 2
                    • B-17F 41-24578 SO*U, "OLD RELIABLE" 26
                    • B-17F 42-3024 SU*K, "ROYAL FLUSH" 2
                    • B-17F 42-3037 SU*Z, "WINDY CITY AVENGER" 4
                    • B-17F 42-3074 JD*B, "LOMA LEE" 5
                    • B-17F 42-3075 BK*M, "LONGHORN" 3
                    • B-17F 42-3088 SU*G, "SUGAR PUSS" 8
                    • B-17F 42-3104 SO*A "RAIDER" 1
                    • B-17F 42-3122 JD*N, "APRIL'S FOOL" 4
                    • B-17F 42-3218 JD*R, "DORIS MAE" 6
                    • B-17F 42-3216 JD*S, "THE JOKER" 1
                    • B-17F 42-3222 JD*P,"DUECES WILD" 3
                    • B-17F 42-3230 JD*U, "YANKEE POWERHOUSE II" 3
                    • B-17F 42-3231 JD*M, "THE INFERNO" 1
                    • B-17F 42-3235 JD*T, "LAKANUKI" 1
                    • B-17F 42-3259 BK*N/JD*T, "SNAFU"/"ALABAMA WHIRLWIND" 1
                    • B-17F 42-3317 XX*X, "SPIRIT OF '76" 3
                    • B-17F 42-3429 SU*F, "FLAKHOUSE" 1
                    • B-17F 42-3440 SU*B/P, "BROADWAY ROSE" 2
                    • B-17F 42-3441, "SPOTTED COW" 16
                    • B-17F 42-5051 SU*M, "BARREL HOUSE BESSIE" 3
                    • B-17F 42-5086 BK*B, "WAHOO II" 2
                    • B-17F 42-5404 JD*M, "GEEZIL" 9
                    • B-17F 42-5444 JD*N, "WE DOOD IT" 9
                    • B-17F 42-5747 SO*M, "HANGAR QUEEN" 4
                    • B-17F 42-5838 SO*P, "MAD MONEY II" 19
                    • B-17F 42-5843 SO*S "BLACK GHOST' 4
                    • B-17F 42-5848 SO*R, "PATCHES" 9
                    • B-17F 42-5849 SO*F, Hell's Belles II 1
                    • B-17F 42-5850 SO*M, Unnamed 2
                    • B-17F 42-5851 2
                    • B-17F 42-5852 SO*T, The Natural 4
                    • B-17F 42-5853 SO*U, "SALVAGE QUEEN" 1
                    • B-17F 42-5855 JD*V, RAMP TRAMP 1
                    • B-17F 42-29529 JD*U, NORA 2 13
                    • B-17F 42-29554 JD*Y "BILLIE" 9
                    • B-17F 42-29557 SO*S,"YANKEE GAL" 2
                    • B-17F 42-29632 JD*K, "Cased Ace" 7
                    • B-17F 42-29636 BK*F, "X-VIRGIN" 5
                    • B-17F 42-29651 SU*G, "STELLA" 12
                    • B-17F 42-29686 SO*B, "PIE-EYED PIPER" 2
                    • B-17F 42-29688 SO*S, "KAYO" 2
                    • B-17F 42-29699 "OLD BATTLE-AXE", SO*D 2
                    • B-17F 42-29717 SU*H/M, "MR FIVE BY FIVE" 3
                    • B-17F 42-29723 BK*B, "WOLF PACK" 5
                    • B-17F 42-29728 SU*J, "EL RAUNCHO" 12
                    • B-17F 42-29733 SU*D, "LOUISIANA PURCHASE" 5
                    • B-17F 42-29768 SO*X, "WINSOME WINN II" 15
                    • B-17F 42-29784 JD*V, "SMILIN-THRU" 6
                    • B-17F 42-29800 BK*H, "ME AN' MY GAL" 4
                    • B-17F 42-29809 JD*X, "DAMN YANKEE II" 2
                    • B-17F 42-29814 SU*D, "THE DALLAS REBEL" 1
                    • B-17F 42-29870 JD*U, "BIG MOOSE" 5
                    • B-17F 42-29914 BK*H, Unnamed 4
                    • B-17F 42-29927 BK*B, "HOMESICK GAL" 3
                    • B-17F 42-29935 BK*K, "PULMADIQUE" 11
                    • B-17F 42-29956 SU*B, "VERTICAL SHAFT" 3
                    • B -17F 42-29960 SU*J, "NYMOKYMI" 1
                    • B-17F 42-30005 BK*A, "SALVAGE QUEEN" 21
                    • B-17F 42-30026 BK*J, "BATTLEWAGON" 22
                    • B-17F 42-30030 BK-E/F, "OLD IRONSIDES" 3
                    • B-17F 42-30031 SU*D, Unnamed 3
                    • B-17F 42-30032 BK*D "SKY QUEEN" 9
                    • B-17F 42-30033 BK*G, "LITTLE AMERICA" 7
                    • B-17F 42-30036 XX*X, Unnamed 1
                    • B-17F 42-30037 BK*F, Unnamed 16
                    • B-17F 42-30043 SO*V, "RUTHLESS" 14
                    • B-17F 42-30046 BK*K & SU*H, "MERRIE HELL" 3
                    • B-17F 42-30048 SU*K, "FLAK DANCER" 7
                    • B-17F 42-30131 SO*Q, Unnamed 2
                    • B-17F 42-30139 JD*O, "SNUFFY" 5
                    • B-17F 42-30142 SU*L, "PISTOL PACKIN MAMMA" 5
                    • B-17F 42-30145 BK*F, Unnamed 2
                    • B-17F 42-30196 BK*Y, "SAD SACK" 5

                    384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) in World War II

                    Welcome to the 384th Bombardment Group (Heavy) Photo Gallery. This gallery makes available the photographic and documentary portion of the 384th BG record. All content on this gallery is visible to all visitors. Those wishing to enter a comment or contribute images will need to register and log in (links at left of Home page). Please register for an account when you need access beyond viewing gallery content. For additional information about the 384th BG, visit the 384th Bomb Group website⇗.

                    Guidance on contributing images can be obtained by downloading this PDF document: Upload Instructions &dArr

                    ATTENTION: DUE TO PROBLEMS IN THE LATEST UPDATE, YOU MUST LOG IN TO SEE THE GALLERY CONTENTS - CREATE AN ACCOUNT IF NECESSARY.

                      (999) (189)
                    • 384th During WWII 6270
                    • 384th After WWII 6700
                    • 384th Wartime Documents 139362
                    • A2 Jacket Art 53
                    • Community 1528
                    • Administrator Upload 3315

                    The Sad Sack ★★ 1957

                    A bumbling hero with a photographic memory winds up in Morocco as a member of the French Foreign Legion. Although a success at the box office, Lewis's second movie (without partner Dean Martin) seems jerky and out of sorts today. Based on the comic strip character by George Baker, but not effectively. 98m/B VHS . Jerry Lewis, Phyllis Kirk, David Wayne, Peter Lorre, Gene Evans, Mary Treen D: George Marshall C: Loyal Griggs M: Burt Bacharach, Hal David.

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                    Watch the video: A tour of the B 17F Flying Fortress Ye Olde Pub Fortress of the skies (June 2022).