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Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17, Michael Lucas

Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17, Michael Lucas



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Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17, Michael Lucas

Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17, Michael Lucas

George Pirie was a South African doctor from a Scottish family who volunteered for service early in the First World War, and who took part in the Gallipoli campaign, the battle of the Somme and the start of third battle of Ypres, where he was killed by German shelling.

One of the most notable features of these diaries is Pirie's changing moods. In most diaries the tone only shifts in one direction, with initial enthusiasm soon fading, and the horrors of the trenches coming to the fore, but here the author's mode goes up and down. As late as April 1917 a day can be described as 'beautiful, so it was top-hole out riding', while an account of a successful aerial battle above the lines produced a 'fine day', while back in 1915 on Gallipoli there are plenty of 'horrible' days.

This is an uncut diary, so as well as the periods of combat we also get Pirie's accounts of his time out of the line. These vary dramatically in quality, with the rare trips away from Gallipoli taking him to Greek islands almost entirely untouched by the war.

We don’t get much medical material, although there are frequent references to the location and relative merits of his medical posts on each front, and the fate of his stretcher bearers and other helpers. Enemy bombardments play a major part in the diary, as does the weather, and the more exciting aerial combats witnessed from the line. Every so often we get Pirie's view of a major Allied attack, many of them costly failures. These entries tend to be longer and rather more sombre than the standard daily round.

Sadly Pirie died in 1917, so his diaries weren't edited after the war. The diary thus reflects what Pirie felt at the time, and gives us his unvarnished views of the fighting.

Part I: The Gallipoli Diary: December 1914-September 1915
1 - From Edinburgh to the Dardanelles, December 1914-May 1915
2 - At Gallipoli, May-September 1915

Part II: The Western Front Diary: March 1916-July 1917
1 - Facing Messines Ridge, March-July 1916
2 - The Somme and Vimy Ridge, July-October 1916
3 - Loos and Lens, October 1916-April 1917
4 - To die in Flanders, April-July 1917

Author: Michael Lucas
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 224
Publisher: Helion
Year: 2014



Diary of a First World War 'Frontline Medic'

9th East Surrey officers, March 1917 (Image: Surrey History Centre) 1 of 6 Captain George Pirie served with the 9th East Surrey Regiment (Image: Helion & Company Ltd) 2 of 6 British shells exploding in Lens, June 1917 (Image: Andrew Lucas) 3 of 6 Ypres in ruins (Image: Author's Collection) 4 of 6 Frontline Medic – Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres, The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17 (Image: Helion & Company Ltd) 5 of 6 Memorial plaque sent to Captain Pirie’s next of kin (Image: Michael Hall) 6 of 6

WW1 memoirs of 9th East Surrey's 'Frontline Medic'

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"I was dressing the wounded in the trenches – enough said. Worse than Hell…"

That was the recollection of &aposFrontline Medic&apos Captain George Pirie, who bravely volunteered for a Royal Army Medical Corps Special Reserve commission in December 1914.

Now, more than 100 years since he set sail for Gallipoli at the beginning of World War One, Capt Pirie&aposs war diaries have been published.

The memoirs recount Gallipoli&aposs casualty-strewn fields where he too was wounded, as well as the Somme and finally at Ypres – where Capt Pirie was tragically killed in action in July 1917.

Editor Michael Lucas said: "Unlike so many accounts - written decades after the war and distorted by fading memories and hindsight - Pirie’s diary is fresh.

"It tells things how they were and, rightly or wrongly, how they were perceived at the time.

“Often fortunately, Pirie did not know what tomorrow would bring for him and his companion.”

&aposMangled men&apos

Redressing the wounds of "mangled men" was a daily occurrence - Capt Pirie&aposs own life under threat while sniper bullets, mortar bombs and shells whistled by.

During the Somme battles - from July 1 to mid-November 1916 - a total of 43 Regimental Medical Officers were killed or died of their wounds, 149 were wounded and four ended up missing.

Serving with infantry battalions including the 9th East Surrey Regiment, the officers were "like family" to Capt Pirie - however, it was the loss of Corporal Halliday that reduced him to tears.

Capt Pirie wrote: "He was mortally wounded in the abdomen whilst getting away the second last stretcher case. That finished me off I wept then. He’s an awful loss to me."

Little more than 12 months later, he would be reunited with the fallen - killed by a shell on his 29th birthday.

&aposBeast of an area&apos

Only three days before, he had written of his reluctance to go to the front line, saying: "It’s a beast of an area."

Of the book, Mr Lucas said: "My greatest thanks must go to the family of Captain Pirie, who have given me permission to edit the diary for publication.

“Of them, I am especially grateful to Peter Strasheim - of Johannesburg, South Africa - for so generously sending me a copy of the diary some years ago because of my interest in the captain’s service with 9th Battalion East Surrey Regiment.

"Whilst Pirie and his comrades saw a lot of horror on the frontline, what struck me is that he also gave a comprehensive view of their lives away from it - including their recreations and even Christmas celebrations.”


Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17, Michael Lucas - History

Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C., born in South Africa and educated in Scotland, kept a detailed diary throughout his front line service with the British Army at Gallipoli and the Somme, up to his death in action at Ypres in July 1917. He was a brave and skillful medic, serving as a regimental medical officer with infantry battalions, who was twice mentioned in Dispatches.

Pirie&rsquos diary is a very special one, not all diaries make good reading. Some are terse, some cover only trivialities, whilst with others the diarist is too absorbed in himself and his immediate concerns. Pirie&rsquos diary has none of these faults. He was a popular and gregarious man with a sense of humor, as well as a keen and sympathetic observer of his fellow soldiers, he saw much front line service, in both big actions and routine trench warfare. His diary throws light on the battles in which he served, the routine life of infantry battalions in and out of the line and the experiences of a regimental medical officer. On the Western Front he served in the 9th East Surrey Regiment, the brigadier of which was General Mitford, of Wipers Gazette fame. He also shared the regiment with R.C. Sherriff, author of Journey&rsquos End, and the men who Sherriff used as models for his play.

Unlike so many accounts, written decades after the war and distorted by fading memories and hindsight, Pirie&rsquos diary is fresh: it tells how things were and, rightly or wrongly, how they were perceived at the time. Often, he did not know what tomorrow would bring for him and his companions. Many of them, like him, did not live to see the Armistice. This diary is the Great War as it was experienced, the strain of unrelenting shelling and sniper fire, with danger ever present in the front line but also the comradeship and light relief in and out of the line, which helped to make things bearable. Pirie&rsquos diary is published here for the first time. It is complete and unabridged, with introductions to the man and his diary, his campaigns, and with extensive notes. The editor has made much use of both published and unpublished sources, while his previous book was a history of the unit with which Pirie served on the Western Front. This book is profusely illustrated with photographs, maps, and contemporary caricatures, including of Pirie and his friends.

About The Author

Michael Lucas’s initial interest in the 9th East Surrey was sparked off by family connections, and he has made an in-depth study of the history of the battalion – and of the part that R.C. Sherriff played in it. As well as consulting a wide range of published and archive sources, he has contacted descendants of soldiers who served in the battalion. He has published a number of articles, chiefly on the Great War, including two in Stand To!, the journal of the Western Front Association.

REVIEWS

&ldquo &hellip a fascinating document &hellip presenting an interesting insight into the life of a Medical Officer on the front line during some of the most ferocious fighting of the war. Unlike many accounts, written decades after the events, Pirie&rsquos diary is fresh and immediate and tells how things were and, rightly or wrongly, how they were perceived at the time. It is an attractively produced book, richly illustrated with photographs, maps, and contemporary caricatures along with useful appendices and a full index. If you&rsquore interested in medical care during the war this is essential reading.&rdquo

- Britain at War

&ldquo &hellip This is an excellent book and Michael Lucas has added a great collection of black and white pictures that add a pictorial content that acts to supplement the words of Pirie at just the right level &hellip I would thoroughly recommend this book to any student of the Great War, the combination of Pirie and Lucas makes much of the text come alive and having read it, you certainly feel that for many of the detailed entries, you were there, looking over the shoulder of George Pirie as he lived his life at war.&rdquo

- Western Front Association

&ldquo &hellip This excellent book &hellip is a fine account of the work of a regimental medical officer in the war &hellip Highly recommended.&rdquo

- Stand To! The Journal of the Western Front Association

&ldquo &hellip wonderfully reproduced and illustrated, another gem made available for us to enjoy.&rdquo

- The Gallopolian: Journal of the Gallipoli Association

Update for October 2016 at HistoryofWar.org: Rise of Macedon, Boulton & Paul aircraft, Tucker class destroyers, M4 Sherman Tank, Prussian leaders of Revolutionary Wars

This month we look at more Boulton & Paul aircraft, two more Tucker class destroyers, and complete our look at the main 75mm gun versions of the Sherman tank. Away from weaponry we look at two figures from early in the life of Philip III of Macedon, and three key Prussian leaders of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

Our picture gallery continues to expand. This month we have three collections donated by readers - Terry Ruff's collection relating to No.357 Squadron, Lt. Col John Marie Robert Audette's photos from the 30 th Bombardment Group and Captain Harold C. James from the 341 st Bombardment Group. We also add new pictures of US Naval Aircraft, US Warships and Napoleon's Marshals.

Philomelus(d.354) was the leader of the Phocians at the start of the Third Sacred War. After a series of early victories he committed suicide to avoid capture after suffering a heavy defeat at the battle of Neon (354 BC).

Ptolemy Alorites (or Ptolemy of Aloros) was a Macedonian who attempted to seize the throne from Alexander II, then acted a regent for Alexander's brother Perdiccas III before being assassinated by Perdiccas, who seized power in his own name.

USS Wadsworth (DD-60) was a Tucker class destroyer that operated from Queenstown and then Brest during the American involvement in the First World war, carrying out a large number of attacks on possible U-boats without recorded success.

USS Jacob Jones (DD-61) was a Tucker class destroyer that became the only US destroyer lost to enemy action during the First World War, when she was sunk by U-53.

Gebhard Lebrecht Fürst Blücher von Wahlstatt was the most famous Prussian commander of the Napoleonic Wars and played an important part in the revival of Prussian military power in 1813-1815 and in the campaigns in Germany, France and of Waterloo.

Frederick William II of Prussia (1744-1797, r.1786-1797) was the king of Prussia at the start of the French Revolutionary Wars, and led Prussia into the War of the First Coalition, before losing interest and taking his country out of the war early in 1795.

Frederick William III (1770-1840, r.1797-1840) was king of Prussia during the Napoleonic Wars, and led Prussia during one of the most disastrous periods in her history in 1806-7 and during her revival in 1813-15.

The Medium Tank M4A3/ Sherman IV had a welded hull and Ford V-8 engine, and was one of the main US service versions. It was also the version chosen for use after the end of the Second World War.

The Medium Tank M4A4/ Sherman V had a welded hull and used the Chrysler multibank engine. The engine was rejected for use by the US Army, but proved to be very reliable in Britain, where over 7,000 tanks were received

The Medium Tank M4E1 was an experimental version of the Sherman that used a diesel version of the Wright G200 Cyclone air-cooled radial engine.

The Medium Tank M4A6 was the final production version of the Sherman, and used the composite hull introduced late in the production of the M4 and a modified version of the Wright Cyclone engine that could use diesel fuel.

The Medium Tank M4A2E1 was a version of the Sherman tank that was powered by a General Motors engine developed from a marine diesel engine.

The Medium Tank M4E3 was an experimental version of the Sherman that was powered by a Chrysler A65 engine.

Boulton & Paul Aircraft

The Boulton & Paul P.67 was a design for a monoplane fighter produced to satisfy Air Ministry Specification F.7/30.

The Boulton & Paul P.69 was a design for a bomber/ transport aircraft, based on the earlier P.64 mail carrier

The Boulton & Paul P.70 was a design for a bomber, based on the earlier P.64 mail carrier and P.69 bomber-transport design, and was the first Boulton & Paul design to be produced with power operated gun turrets from the start.

The Boulton Paul P.74 was the company's first design for a turret fighter, and was a twin engined design that would have carried two turrets.

The 404th Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge, the crossing of the Rhine and the invasion of Germany.

The 405th Fighter Group (USSAF) served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day landings, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge, the crossing of the Rhine and the invasion of Germany.

The 406th Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day landings, the break out from Normandy, the sieges of St Malo and Brest, the advance across France, the Battle of the Bulge and the advance into Germany.

Terry Ruff Collection, No.357 Squadron

Lt. Col John Marie Robert Audette, 38th Bombardment Squadron, 30th Bombardment Group

Captain Harold C. James, 11th Bombardment Squadron, 341st Bombardment Group

The C.S.S. Albemarle and William Cushing: The Remarkable Confederate Ironclad and the Union Officer Who Sank It, Jim Stempel.
Follows the twin stories of the construction and service of the Confederate Ironclad ram Albemarle and the life of impressive young Naval officer who sank her. Follows both stories from start to finish, covering them in parallel, so events on shore as the ship is being built are lined up with Cushing's developing career, before the two come together in the daring raid that sank the Albemarle and the escape that followed
[read full review]

A Moonlight Massacre, Michael Locicero.
A detailed history of a little known night attack that came after the official end of the Third Battle of Ypres, and that was intended to improve the British position on the northern edge of Passchendaele Ridge. Demonstrates the problems that could be caused by poor communications and the confusion of a night time attack, even in the increasingly expert British army of 1917, while also examining the real end of the British offensive action at Ypres in 1917
[read full review]

The Horns of the Beast - The Swakop River Campaign and World War I in South-West Africa 1914-15, James Stejskal.
Focuses on the successful South African invasion of German South-West Africa, a brief campaign that rarely gets more than a paragraph or two in histories of the First World War. This book focuses on one part of that campaign, the successful advance up the Swakop River which led to the defeat of the main German army in the area and the eventual surrender of the entire colony. Often neglected, this was an important victory for the South Africans, and helped unite the colony at the start of the Great War
[read full review]

War Cruel and Sharp: English Strategy under Edward III, Clifford J. Rogers.
Looks at the first phase of the Wars of the Roses, to the Peace of Bretigny of 1360, and argues that Edward III's victory was due to a deliberate strategy of seeking battle. Makes a very well argued case, supported by a detailed knowledge of the primary sources, built around a narrative account of Edward's campaigns in Scotland, where he learnt his craft, and in France.
[read full review]

Wanton Troops - Buckinghamshire in the Civil Wars 1640-1660, Ian F.W. Beckett.
Looks at the impact of the Civil Wars on a county that didn’t see any major battles or host any of the major garrisons, but was instead placed between them, suffering from raids, garrisons and passing armies. Looks at County Community before, during and after the war, and the impact of the fighting on the local communities of Buckinghamshire to produce a useful cross section of the disruption caused by the Civil War
[read full review]

German U-Boat Losses During World War II, Axel Niestlé.
An excellent well documented and credible summary of the current state of knowledge on U-Boat losses during the Second World War, reflecting the discoveries made in German archives and in underwater explanation in the sixty years since the original post-war assessments were made. Each change is supported by a clear explanation of why the original assessment is wrong, and the evidence for the new assessment
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The War of the Spanish Succession 1701-1714, James Falkner.
An excellent new single volume history of this important conflict, covering all of the areas of conflict and the related diplomatic manoeuvres. Provides a clear example of a war in which outstanding military victories didn’t lead to the sort of political results that one might have expected, but one that still greatly reduced the power of France and set the tone for the series of wars that dominated the Eighteenth Century
[read full review]

Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, R.A.M.C. 1914-17, Michael Lucas.
Follows the experiences of a South African doctor from a Scottish family through some of the most notorious battles of the First World War, following Pirie in and out of the lines. An uncut diary that includes both dramatic accounts of major Allied attacks and rest time out of the trenches, as well as the day-to-day life in and around the trenches. Unedited after the war, this gives a contemporary day by day view of Pirie's view of the war.
[read full review]

Victory was Beyond Their Grasp, Douglas E. Nash.
A history of the 272nd Volks-Grenadier Division, based around the company records of Fusilier Company 272, and tracing the unit from its formation, through the bitter fighting in the Hürtgen Forest, and on to the brief defence of the Rhine and the final chaotic retreat into the heart of Germany. An excellent history of a division that suffered a huge number of casualties, with the Fusilier Company alone suffered over 200% casualties
[read full review]


George Penrose

On the night of 8 October 1916, 2nd Lieutenant R C Sherriff spent his first night in the front line. His Battalion was due to occupy the trench two days later, and his Commanding Officer had decreed that Sherriff, recently arrived from England, and new to the trenches, must go up for a night in advance, to ‘get used to it’. The experience made a big impression on him, and he wrote about it at some length in his unpublished memoir, Memories of Active Service. The officer who showed him the ropes that night was Captain George Alwyn Penrose, of the 8th Queen’s – an ‘elegant, courtly young man,’ whom Sherriff regarded ‘with feelings of admiration and awe’. Just six months later, Penrose was dead.

George Alwyn Penrose. From the Merchant Taylors’ School Archive, The Taylorian, volume 39, 1916-17.

Penrose was born in Ilford on 11 December 1893, making him two and a half years older than Sherriff. His early schooling is unknown, but in 1907 (aged 13) he won a place at Merchant Taylors’ School, where he remained for three years, leaving to join the Sun Life Insurance office in 1910.

His school magazine, The Taylorian (Vol 39, 1916-17), recorded his skill in shooting, noting that he fired in the Ashburton Cup at the age of 14, and then went on to win the inter-office cup for the Sun Life office (a cup which had been held for fifty consecutive years by the Sun Fire office, of which, of course, Sherriff was a member). He even competed at Bisley, winning a life membership of the National Rifle Association.

At Merchant Taylors’ he was a member of the OTC, and in February 1912 he joined the Artists’ Rifles (then a Territorial Regiment), rising to the position of Lance-Corporal by the time war broke out. He received his Commission in the Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment in October 1914, and was promoted to Captain in July 1916.

When Sherriff went up to Vimy Ridge that first evening, he arrived at the 8/Queen’s trenches at Stand-to:

‘Captain Penrose…was standing on the Fire Step, gazing through the falling darkness: some men were standing by him, and he was talking to them quietly. He saw me: “You’d better get down the dugout”, he said curtly.’

Sherriff did so, sitting alone by a table where, as his Memoir records:

‘a solitary candle spluttered itself away – an earwig hurriedly ran round and round the light in a little circle. I watched it in the deadly silence. I thought what a fool the thing was, to spend its time running round a candle in a dugout on Vimy Ridge, when it was free to go anywhere. I sat and envied that earwig.’ [The incident has echoes at the beginning of Journey’s End, where Hardy and Osborne discuss a similar earwig.]

At Penrose’s suggestion Sherriff tried to get some sleep until they went on duty together at 10:00pm, but Sherriff found it hard – it was still early, the surroundings were strange, and unfamiliar and frightening noises drifted in from outside the dugout, adding to his anxiety. Just before the two men made their way out of the dugout and into the trench, Penrose offered Sherriff some advice: ‘I shouldn’t take a walking stick, it’s in the way,’ he told Sherriff – in words almost identical to those which Trotter would use to Raleigh in the first Act of Journey’s End (‘You don’t want a walking stick. It gets in your way if you have to run fast’).

Sherriff’s Memoir describes the unfamiliar sights and sounds of the trench, and of No Man’s land, and recounts how the two men patrolled the trench, with Penrose talking to his men as they passed, and offering his wisdom to Sherriff. At one point they climbed over the parapet to inspect the wire, with Sherriff expecting to be killed at any moment. Then it was on to Ersatz crater, which lay in No Man’s Land, with the British on one lip, and the Germans on the opposite side (see Map): ‘This crater post, with the two hollowed out recesses where the men lay and watched, formed one of those God forsaken, devilish outposts of the Front line,’ wrote Sherriff.

While they were at the crater post, Sherriff found himself wondering how long the men and their Captain might survive – this Captain who ‘looked so out of place on this ridge of corruption and death in his neatly cut tunic and breeches, his well-polished gaiters and light silk tie.’ In fact Penrose survived just six more months, eventually being killed by a shrapnel shell falling behind the lines in Bully Grenay on 9 April, as he marched his men to an Easter church parade. The Germans had recently begun shelling behind the British lines, and the East Surreys had been glad to leave Divisional Reserve on 7 April and relieve the 8/Queen’s in the front line, as their medic, Captain George Pirie, had recorded in his Diary the following day:

‘Here we are back in the trenches again. We came in again last night and I don’t mind being here at all because Bully was getting a bit hot with shells flying about…The Queens, whom we relieved, are not looking forward to going to Bully.’ [See: Frontline Medic: Gallipoli, Somme, Ypres: The Diary of Captain George Pirie, RAMC. 1914-1917. By Michael Lucas]

The Taylorian records that Penrose had seen continuous service with the regiment, going through the Battle of Loos, and the winter campaign of 1915-16 (Delville Wood and Guillemont). Penrose himself told Sherriff of how, during the Somme, he felt he had, on one occasion at least, saved his company:

‘The Bosch started to barrage my line [so] I got all my men out of the front line and made them lie down in No Man’s Land, under our wire. The Bosch blew my trenches to hell, but he never hit a man of mine. After an hour or so he attacked through the dark and we got guns on him as quick as anything…’

According to his Colonel Penrose’s untiring work as sniping officer during the winter of 1916-17 had saved his battalion many casualties. As a company commander he could be relied upon in any circumstances.

The Battalion Diary records that Captain G A Penrose was buried in the cemetery at Bully Grenay on 10 April 1917.


First World War diaries published

That’s the recollection of ‘Frontline Medic’ Captain George Pirie who, as one of ‘Kitchener’s Army’, bravely volunteered for a Royal Army Medical Corps Special Reserve commission in December 1914.

It was a selfless decision that would take him to the casualty-strewn fields of Gallipoli (where he too was wounded), the Somme and finally Ypres where he was tragically killed in action in July 1917.

Now, to honour the Regimental Medical Officer (R.M.O.) who was said to have an ‘indefatigable’ devotion to duty, editor Michael Lucas has brought Pirie’s war diaries to a centenary audience with the support of publisher Helion & Company Ltd.

Lucas said: “Unlike so many accounts, written decades after the war and distorted by fading memories and hindsight, Pirie’s diary is fresh. It tells things how they were and, rightly or wrongly, how they were perceived at the time.”

Lucas has also authored ‘The ‘Journey’s End’ Battalion – 9th East Surrey in the Great War’.

“Often fortunately, Pirie did not know what tomorrow would bring for him and his companions.”

South African-born, the gregarious captain ‘loved by both officers and men’ graduated with a Distinction in Medicine from the University of Edinburgh. He would go on to fight with the British Army – serving with infantry battalions including the 9th East Surrey Regiment, which he shared with ‘Journey’s End’ playwright R.C. Sherriff.

Redressing the wounds of ‘mangled men’ was a daily occurrence – his own mortality under threat while sniper bullets, mortar bombs and shells (the biggest killers) whistled by. Casualties among R.M.Os were high. During the Somme battles between 1 July to mid-November 1916, 43 were killed or died of wounds 149 were wounded and four were missing. The East Surrey officers were ‘like family’ to him, however it was the loss of his Corporal Halliday that reduced Pirie to tears.

He wrote in his diary: “He was mortally wounded in the abdomen whilst getting away the second last stretcher case. That finished me off I wept then. He’s an awful loss to me.”

Little over 12 months later, Pirie would be reunited with the fallen – killed by a shell on his 29 th birthday. Only three days before he had written of his reluctance to go to the front line: ‘It’s a beast of an area’.

Lucas explained: “My greatest thanks must go to the family of Captain Pirie, who have given me permission to edit the diary for publication. Of them, I am especially grateful to Peter Strasheim from Johannesburg, South Africa, for so generously sending me a copy of the diary some years ago because of my interest in the captain’s service with 9th Battalion East Surrey Regiment.

“Whilst Pirie and his comrades saw a lot of horror on the frontline, what struck me is that he also gave a comprehensive view of their lives away from it – including their recreations and even Christmas celebrations.”

Profusely illustrated with photographs, maps and contemporary caricatures, including some of Pirie and his friends – the diaries have been reproduced complete and unabridged with introductions to the man and his diary his campaigns and with extensive notes.

The founder of Helion & Company, Duncan Rogers, said: “Pirie’s humanity shines through when reading his diaries, despite the often inhuman conditions he was working under. This is a unique opportunity to read about multiple theatres of war and to see how medical services operated in Gallipoli and on the Western Front through the eyes of one courageous man.”


Two Wheels to War: A Tale of Twelve Bright Young Men Who Volunteered Their Own Motorcycles for the British Expeditionary Force 1914

'Adventures of a despatch rider' originally published: William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh and London, 1915.

  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: HELION & CO
  • Erscheinungstermin: 26. Juni 2017
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 249mm x 175mm x 23mm
  • Gewicht: 916g
  • ISBN-13: 9781911096580
  • ISBN-10: 1911096583
  • Artikelnr.: 44677807

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Abstract

This research examines intransigence in accounting systems. Using historical research methods and archival sources, it explores intransigence in the Royal Army Medical Corps’ accounting systems in the context of the incidence of shell shock among British Army soldiers fighting at the battlefront during the First World War. The Army did not recognise shell shock as a medical condition and made few changes to its medical accounting systems for soldiers with shell shock. The four factors of system stability of the AGIL scheme (adaptation, goal attainment, integration, latency) are used to understand the limited medical accounting response to shell shock. This research indicates that in addition to historical and internal political reasons for intransigence, intransigence will occur unless a factor in the AGIL scheme is sufficiently impaired to make the accounting system unstable and force system change. This research finding has contemporary relevance, explaining accounting intransigence in response to issues of social concern.


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Watch the video: World War One Soldiers Diary Extracts Go Online (August 2022).