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America’s Oldest Known Time Capsule Was Made by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams

America’s Oldest Known Time Capsule Was Made by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams


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1. The 1876 Century Safe

The world’s first planned time capsule debuted in 1876, when New York magazine publisher Anna Deihm assembled a “Century Safe” at the U.S. Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. The iron box was stuffed with 19th century relics including a gold pen and inkstand, a book on temperance, a collection of Americans’ signatures, and snapshots of President Ulysses S. Grant and other politicians taken by photographer Mathew Brady. After being sealed in 1879, the purple velvet-lined safe was taken to the U.S. Capitol and eventually left to languish under the East Portico. Though nearly forgotten, it was later rediscovered, restored and unlocked on schedule in July 1976 during the nation’s bicentennial festivities. At a ceremony attended by President Gerald Ford, Senator Mike Mansfield said the opening had honored “the wish of a lady who sought to speak to us from the other side of a 100-year gulf.”

2. The Massachusetts State House Time Capsule

The United States’ oldest known time capsule was the work of none other than Samuel Adams and Paul Revere. In late 2014, repairmen fixing a water leak at the Massachusetts State House uncovered a brass box that the two former Sons of Liberty had placed in a cornerstone to mark the building’s construction back in 1795. It had already been opened once in 1855 for cleaning and the addition of new artifacts, and historians were initially unsure if its contents had survived intact. When it was finally unsealed in 2015, however, it was found to contain a trove of preserved artifacts including newspapers, coins dating back to the 1600s, a page from the Massachusetts Colony Records and a copper medal with an image of “General of the American Army” George Washington. Most exciting of all was a silver plaque—most likely the work of Revere—that read, “This cornerstone of a building intended for the use of the legislative and executive branches of the government of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts was laid by his Excellency Samuel Adams, Esquire, governor of the said Commonwealth.”

3. The Crypt of Civilization

Most time capsules contain only a few trinkets or letters, but Oglethorpe University’s “Crypt of Civilization” represents an audacious attempt to preserve all of human knowledge for posterity. The project was the brainchild of the university’s president, Thornwell Jacobs, who believed it might serve as a valuable record for archaeologists in the distant future. Beginning in 1937, he converted an underground 20-by-10 chamber in the administration building into a museum of civilization filled with everything from 640,000 pages of microfilmed books and religious texts to an early television, a container of beer and a set of toy Lincoln Logs. The vault even features a special “language integrator” to help teach English to whoever might find it. The entire haul was welded off behind an airtight stainless steel door during a ceremony in May 1940. Jacobs decreed that it should remain closed for 6,177 years—the same amount of time that was then thought to have passed since the beginning of recorded history. The Crypt remains at Oglethorpe University to this day, and is now more than 75 years into its long journey to the year 8113 A.D.

4. The Westinghouse Time Capsules

During the future-themed 1939 New York World’s Fair, the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company entombed a torpedo-shaped cylinder inside a 50-foot-deep “Immortal Well” on the fairgrounds in Flushing Meadows. The cylinder was originally called a “time bomb,” but the name was changed after a Westinghouse publicist coined the now-famous term “time capsule.” Another capsule was placed nearby in 1965, and both are now scheduled for opening in the year 6939 A.D.— 5,000 years after the first one was buried. The items inside the two capsules include a collection of seeds, metals and textiles; microfilm and newsreels; and everyday items such as a Beatles record, a bikini, a pack of Camel cigarettes and a plastic child’s cup featuring Mickey Mouse. The 1939 capsule also featured a letter from physicist Albert Einstein, who praised the scientific progress of his age but also added that, “People living in different countries kill each other at irregular time intervals, so that also for this reason any one who thinks about the future must live in fear and terror.”

5. The Detroit Century Box

Shortly after the clocks struck midnight on January 1, 1901, Mayor William C. Maybury sealed a copper time capsule at Detroit’s Old City Hall and proclaimed that it was not to be touched for 100 years. When Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer finally opened the “Century Box” in December 2000, it was found to contain several dozen letters to the future written by the city’s business and political leaders. Most of the missives included descriptions of the wonders of 1900 Detroit along with musings on what life in 21st century might be like. “How much faster are you traveling?” Maybury asked his future successor. “We talk by long distance telephone to the remotest cities in our own country…Are you talking with foreign lands and to the islands of the sea by the same method?” Other prognosticators were not so accurate. A few speculated that Canada would be annexed or that Ontario would become a U.S. state, and the Metropolitan Police Commissioners wrote that, “prisoners instead of being conveyed to the several police stations in Automobile patrol wagons will be sent through pneumatic tubes, flying machines, or some similar process.”

6. The Expo ’70 Time Capsule

1939 wasn’t the only year that a world’s fair included an ambitious time capsule project. For the 1970 Expo in Osaka, Japan, the electronics giant Panasonic constructed a kettle-shaped capsule designed to remain unopened for 5,000 years. The main container was filled with a protective layer of inert argon gas to protect its contents, but the project leaders also built a second “control” capsule that will be periodically opened, inspected and cleaned to ensure its survival and help keep the project’s memory alive. The first opening already took place in 2000, and the rest will occur at intervals of 100 years. In total, each capsule contains a cargo of 2,098 culturally significant objects, many of them suggested by the public. If the two capsules endure until the planned opening date of 6970 A.D., their future owners will find an extensive collection of films, seeds and microorganisms as well as a ceremonial kimono, a Slinky and even the blackened fingernail of a survivor of the 1945 Hiroshima atomic bombing.

7. The Juneau Time Capsule

Juneau, Alaska’s Federal Building includes an unusual attraction in the form a room-sized time capsule fitted with a plate glass observation window. First closed off in 1994, the 9-by-6 foot chamber is packed with thousands of pieces of memorabilia scrounged by locals as part of a citywide project. Many of the objects are everyday relics of the 90s—a Wonderbra, a Sony Walkman, a Barbie doll—but there are also old drivers licenses, family mementos and a box containing menus from all of Juneau’s restaurants. The vault also includes hundreds of letters written by schoolchildren to the students of the future. Copies of the notes were put on display several years later, but the originals will remain sealed off until New Years Eve 2094—the date when the capsule is scheduled to be opened after 100 years. “If you want to include me in your history book as the best fifth grader in the year 1994-1995,” one student wrote, “go ahead and do it.”

8. The Future Library

Scottish artist Katie Paterson’s Future Library is a literary time capsule that will be a century in the making. Starting in 2014, a new author will be invited to submit a novel, poem or other written text to the project each year for 100 years. In 2114, the entire collection will be published all at once—no doubt posthumously for many of its contributors. A forest of 1,000 trees has already been planted outside Oslo, Norway to supply the paper for the printing. None of the entries will be available to read until the project is complete, however, and the writers are forbidden to reveal anything about their works other than the title. Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood submitted the first manuscript, called “Scribbler Moon,” in 2014, and British author David Mitchell provided the second the following year. Their manuscripts, along with 98 forthcoming titles from other writers, will be held in a public library in Oslo until their official unveiling in the 22nd century.


Photos: Time Capsule from 1795 Reveals Pieces of American History

The contents of a 220-year-old time capsule, buried in 1795 by Samuel Adams and Paul Revere, were revealed on Jan. 6. The Massachusetts Commonwealth and Museum of Fine Arts dug the capsule out of a cornerstone of the Massachusetts State House in Boston. Specially trained museum workers opened the capsule and carefully removed the contents, including coins, newspapers, a silver plaque engraved by Paul Revere and a copper medal depicting George Washington. [Read full story about the time capsule's opening]

This copper box was originally buried in 1795. It was first dug up in 1855 when it's contents were recorded, cleaned and then reburied. It was rediscovered in summer 2014 and dug up again on Dec. 11, 2014. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Malcolm Rogers, the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) director, gave a speech before executive director of the Massachusetts Archive Michael Comeau and MFA conservator Pam Hatchfield show the contents of the capsule that they carefully removed. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Hatchfield holds out the plaque that experts believe Paul Revere himself engraved. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick takes a closer look at the plaque. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

The time capsule held silver and copper coins dating from 1652 to 1855. Five silver coins were also found buried around the capsule. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Experts believe that Paul Revere engraved the silver plaque found inside the time capsule. The capsule also held a copper medal depciting George Washington, newspapers, an impressions of the seal of the Commonwealth and the title page of the Massachusetts Colony Records. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Experts had to carefully remove excess plaster from the brass container and chipped off corrosion around the edges and screws keeping the capsule sealed shut. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

The contents of the time capsule will be put on display at the MFA for a brief exhibition. Experts will then rebury the time capsule at the State House. (Credit: Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)


America's Oldest Time Capsule Was Just Unearthed In Boston—But What's Inside?

The practice of the time capsule—putting mementos from the present and hiding them away for future generations to uncover—has been in place for a while. But did you know that even our founding fathers participated in this tradition?

The oldest time capsule in the United States was discovered in Boston by construction workers who were repairing and replacing the water irrigation system at the Massachusetts State House.

Today, Pam Hitchfield from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts braved the cold to chisel away a block of granite and unearth the relic. The excavation was overseen by Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin, who told ABC News that he is hopeful the contents are still in good condition.

"We know that some of the items were washed with acid in 1855 because of the humidity," Galvin said. We don’t know if that caused deterioration. We are still hopeful that the contents are in good condition. It’s hard work. Back then they probably had a horse and buggy transport that cornerstone and it is still solid today.”

AP Photo/Stephan Savoia

The 219 year-old time capsule was conceived of by then-Governor Samuel Adams and Paul Revere, and buried in the cornerstone of the building's Golden Dome in 1795. The capsule was originally made of cowhide, but was later replaced by a metal box in 1855 during renovations on the building.

The box has yet to be opened, however, state records indicate that we might find a collection of coins dating from 1652 to 1855, an engraved silver plate from Paul Revere, newspapers, the seal of the Commonweath, cards and a title page of the Massachusetts Colony Records. The capsule is believe to be made of copper or tin and measure 5 by 7 inches.

Officials hope to X-ray it over the coming weekend and potentially open it next week.

"It's exciting," Massachusetts Secretary of State Bill Galvin told the Los Angeles Times. "The history of Massachusetts is the history of America, in many respects."

This wasn't the first time capsule to be discovered in the historic city this year. Back in September the Bostonian Society hoisted down the iconic lion and unicorn statues that perch upon the Old State House after learning about a potential relic hidden within the lion's head.

A descendant of the artist who created it notified the society of its existence in 2011 with a Boston Daily Globe article dated February 24, 1901 and headlined "Copper Box to be Placed in Head of the King of Beasts."

Getty Images

Found within the shoe-sized box were photographs of public officials and workers, a wooden piece of the original lion statue from 1713, memorabilia from Boston-area newspapers and a hardback book titled "Foreign Relations of the United States, 1896."

Officials opted to craft a new-era 2014 capsule to place inside the golden beast, including a 2013 Boston Marathon medal, an Apple iPhone 5, Red Sox tickets and a fragment of a 1713 brick from the building. The statue was returned atop the Old State House building back in November for future generations to uncover.


Oldest Time Capsule in US Unearthed at Massachusetts State House

The capsule was buried in 1795 by then-Gov. Samuel Adams and Paul Revere.

Oldest Time Capsule in US Unearthed at Massachusetts State House

— -- Conservators from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts labored in the chill and snow for hours today to unearth what is believed to be the oldest unopened time capsule in the country, buried under the Golden Dome of the Massachusetts State House in 1795 by then-Governor Samuel Adams and Paul Revere, according to state records.

The 219-year-old capsule is made of cowhide and was initially discovered during State House renovations in 1855. When the repairs were complete, the state’s 23rd governor, Henry Gardner, re-buried it in the granite cornerstone of the historic building, adding new items, including coins.

Four coins clinked on the cold ground today as conservator Pam Hitchfield laid on her back and chiseled at the cornerstone. The silver pieces were picked up and displayed to reporters who stood in the mud around the fenced-in dig site.

Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvin oversaw the painstaking efforts to preserve the capsule’s contents for much of today. He told ABC News that after the capsule was found by workers overhauling a water irrigation system in the building, state records were uncovered about the capsule that indicate it contained coins that date between 1652 and 1855, an engraved silver Paul Revere plate, newspapers, a Commonwealth seal and a title page from the Massachusetts Colony Records.

"We know that some of the items were washed with acid in 1855 because of the humidity. We don’t know if that caused deterioration. We are still hopeful that the contents are in good condition," Galvin said. “It’s hard work. Back then they probably had a horse and buggy transport that cornerstone and it is still solid today.”

By 2:30 p.m. the capsule remained entombed in the granite. This is the second significant historical discovery associated with the State House on Boston’s Beacon Hill, which played a key role in the launching of the American Revolution.

Earlier this year, workers found a time capsule from 1901 hidden beneath statues of a lion and a unicorn. Inside were photographs, letters, and newspaper articles that were in legible condition.

When the capsule is removed from the cornerstone, it will be X-rayed at the Museum of Fine Arts and then opened. The public will have an opportunity to view a display of the artifacts found.


Oldest US Time Capsule Opened

The time capsule unearthed in Boston was buried by Samuel Adams.

Boston Museum Unveils Time Capsule From the Colonial Era

— -- The oldest time capsule discovered in the country that dates back to 1795 was opened Tuesday in Boston as history buffs waited to get a glimpse of items from the nation's infancy.

Pamela Hatchfield, head of objects conservation at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, first removed the lid then inspected a newspaper, after loosening the screws beforehand for about four or five hours, she said.

"This is clearly a newspaper and it’s really packed in there," Hatchfield said, wearing gloves and a white coat and using tools including a porcupine quill and a dentist's probe.

She also found 24 coins in various denominations dating from the 1650s to the 1850s, when the capsule was opened then resealed. The folded newspapers appeared to be in very good condition but it was not possible to tell the dates or what news was being reported.

A silver plate at the bottom contained information about the laying of the cornerstone box, which was done by then Gov. Samuel Adams assisted by Paul Revere. American Revolution patriot Revere and Adams originally placed the relic under a cornerstone of the Boston Statehouse in 1795.


220-year-old time capsule opened in Boston

The oldest time capsule ever discovered in America, which dates back to 1795, was opened Tuesday in Boston.

The time capsule was removed from the Massachusetts State House cornerstone Dec. 11 of last year, along with miscellaneous coins. Museum and state officials removed its contents for the first time since 1855, when its contents were documented and cleaned, officials said.

The relic had originally been placed under a cornerstone of the Boston Statehouse in 1795 by American Revolution patriot Paul Revere and then-Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams.

Additional materials were added then to the time capsule in 1855, which was placed in brass, and plastered into the underside of the granite cornerstone.

The capsule was opened Tuesday evening at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, allowing only credentialed media because of "extremely limited space and object sensitivity."

Pamela Hatchfield, head of objects conservation at the museum, first removed the lid after having loosened the screws beforehand for about four to five hours, she said. Inside the capsule, Hatchfield removed folded newspapers and minted coins.

Another item removed. Assorted morning papers of the day?These appear to be 19th century. pic.twitter.com/1HzWgTq28j

&mdash Ben Edwards (@BostonHistory) January 6, 2015

"This is clearly a newspaper and it's really packed in there," Hatchfield said, wearing gloves and a white coat and using tools including a porcupine quill and a dentist's probe.

Hatchfield also found 24 coins in various denominations, all dating from the 1650s to the 1850s, when the capsule was opened then resealed. The folded newspapers appeared to be in very good condition but it was not possible to tell the dates or what news was being reported.

Because museum experts must use extreme caution in preserving the artifacts, more details are expected as Hatchfield and her team continue to exhume the capsule's contents.

Though, according to X-rays taken at the MFA in December, the capsule appears to contain even more artifacts.

"X-rays revealed what is believed to be a collection of silver and copper coins (dating from 1652 and 1855) an engraved silver plate a copper medal depicting George Washington newspapers the seal of the Commonwealth cards and a title page from the Massachusetts Colony Records," the MFA said in a statement last month. "These objects were described in the 1855 account of the reburying ceremony."


220-year-old time capsule opened in Boston

The oldest time capsule ever discovered in America, which dates back to 1795, was opened Tuesday in Boston.

The time capsule was removed from the Massachusetts State House cornerstone Dec. 11 of last year, along with miscellaneous coins. Museum and state officials removed its contents for the first time since 1855, when its contents were documented and cleaned, officials said.

The relic had originally been placed under a cornerstone of the Boston Statehouse in 1795 by American Revolution patriot Paul Revere and then-Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams.

Additional materials were added then to the time capsule in 1855, which was placed in brass, and plastered into the underside of the granite cornerstone.

The capsule was opened Tuesday evening at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, allowing only credentialed media because of "extremely limited space and object sensitivity."

Pamela Hatchfield, head of objects conservation at the museum, first removed the lid after having loosened the screws beforehand for about four to five hours, she said. Inside the capsule, Hatchfield removed folded newspapers and minted coins.

Another item removed. Assorted morning papers of the day?These appear to be 19th century. pic.twitter.com/1HzWgTq28j

&mdash Ben Edwards (@BostonHistory) January 6, 2015

"This is clearly a newspaper and it's really packed in there," Hatchfield said, wearing gloves and a white coat and using tools including a porcupine quill and a dentist's probe.

Hatchfield also found 24 coins in various denominations, all dating from the 1650s to the 1850s, when the capsule was opened then resealed. The folded newspapers appeared to be in very good condition but it was not possible to tell the dates or what news was being reported.

Because museum experts must use extreme caution in preserving the artifacts, more details are expected as Hatchfield and her team continue to exhume the capsule's contents.

Though, according to X-rays taken at the MFA in December, the capsule appears to contain even more artifacts.

"X-rays revealed what is believed to be a collection of silver and copper coins (dating from 1652 and 1855) an engraved silver plate a copper medal depicting George Washington newspapers the seal of the Commonwealth cards and a title page from the Massachusetts Colony Records," the MFA said in a statement last month. "These objects were described in the 1855 account of the reburying ceremony."


The Oldest Time Capsule In American History Was Just Opened - Here's What's Inside

Paul Revere, Samuel Adams, and William Scollay buried a time capsule in Boston more than 200 years ago, and right now we're finally seeing inside.

Opening up the capsule took more than four hours because of some difficult screws on its top , according to CNN.

Coins from 1853, 1855, couple dimes, three-cent piece, pennies, and a 'quardollar' (sic I swear) #bostontimecapsule pic.twitter.com/0GiMSKNU2A

- Alan Yuhas (@AlanYuhas) January 6, 2015

Three-cent pieces were hoarded during the civil war for their silver, conservator Matt says #bostontimecapsule pic.twitter.com/wUwTSOSZZd

- Alan Yuhas (@AlanYuhas) January 6, 2015

'Now I'm excited' and conservator Pam lifts a little off her seat in excitement #bostontimecapsule pic.twitter.com/Dn1WasKQAi

- Alan Yuhas (@AlanYuhas) January 6, 2015

Silver plate imprinted in 1795, maybe Paul Revere made, laid by Sam Adams #bostontimecapsule pic.twitter.com/gA72ghd7ic

- Alan Yuhas (@AlanYuhas) January 7, 2015

Here are a couple photos of workers digging the time capsule out of the state house back in the middle of December:

Extracting this old time capsule here at the State House is not an easy process. pic.twitter.com/WVOSn4QW0v

- Carl Stevens (@carlwbz) December 11, 2014

The time capsule, first buried by Paul Revere and Sam Adams, contains old coins and other old stuff. #wbz pic.twitter.com/wPEamGWnKW

- Carl Stevens (@carlwbz) December 11, 2014

Old time capsules have been seen in Boston before.

Earlier this year, crews doing restoration work in the old State House, which is now a historical museum, found a time capsule from 1901 hidden beneath statues of a lion and a unicorn. The capsule contained letters, photographs, and newspaper articles in mint condition, according to NECN.

Back in the 18th century, the old State House was "the center of Boston 's civic life" and "the scene of some of the most dramatic chapters in the lead-up to the American Revolution," according to The Bostonian Society.


1795 Boston Time Capsule Finally Opened, Here's What's Inside

Remember that time capsule that survived 220 years of Boston weather — blizzards and all — tucked inside a cornerstone of the Massachusetts State House?

Nearly a month after the time capsule, the oldest known of its kind, was removed from the building, antiquities experts finally opened the 10-pound box for the first time since 1855, and what they found inside has history buffs gushing.

Using a porcupine quill, and other tools, Boston Museum of Fine Arts Conservator Pam Hatchfield pried open the box and found five newspapers, 23 coins, a silver plate made by Paul Revere, a bronze medal depicting George Washington and other priceless historical documents, The Boston Globe reports.

One of the coins, a Pine Tree Shilling, dates back to 1652 and was created in defiance of England, NBC News reports.

The time capsule was placed in the cornerstone of the Massachusetts State House by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams, amongst others, in 1795 to honor the 20th anniversary of American independence and to commemorate the construction of the building.

In 1855 workers happened upon the time capsule during repairs to the statehouse. The workers removed the time capsule from the cornerstone, cleaned and cataloged it and added additional artifacts from the time period. They then placed the capsule back into the cornerstone, where it remained until December 2014.

Conservationists must now decide what action to take on the contents of the box. Some of the artifacts corroded in the elements over the years, especially the coins, and as The Boston Globe notes, restoring the coins could be costly.

What is known is that the contents, once put on display at Boston ’ s Museum of Fine Arts Americas wing, won ’ t stay there for long. Eventually, the artifacts will return to the time capsule, which will be placed back into the cornerstone of the statehouse, unlikely to be reopened during your lifetime.


Blasts from the Past: 7 Cool Historical Time Capsules

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, photograph by Harris & Ewing,

When genealogists think of buried treasure, most don’t picture a creaky wooden chest full of shiny gold coins. Instead, caches of photos, newspapers and records often come to mind—the kinds of things that might be hidden inside a time capsule. These blasts from the past hold treasures someone carefully selected to represent themselves and their times, and then stowed away for an unknown future person to find.

There’s actually a society that keeps track of these genealogical collections: the International Time Capsule Society, hosted at Oglethorpe University in Georgia. The group oversees “the father of the modern time capsule,” the strangely curious Crypt of Civilization. The 20-by-10-foot underground room, designed to hold records for 6,000 years, is filled with documents, photos and artifacts of modern civilization.

The chamber’s stainless steel door was welded shut in May 1940, to be reopened in the year 8113. Visitors can gaze upon the door. Nobody alive now will be around for that unveiling (I’m imagining copies of the 1890 census in there), but on these pages, you can bear witness to the opening of other famous time capsules and their curious contents. Here’s a look at seven of these blasts from the past.

1. Revere Reveal: 1795–2014

A copper box filled with colonial artifacts selected in 1795 by none other than Paul Revere and Samuel Adams is widely accepted as the oldest American time capsule. The box was laid beneath the cornerstone of Boston’s State House on July 4, 1795, as the site was dedicated.

The box doesn’t fit the technical definition of a “time capsule” because no one set a specific date to open it. Rather, it would be called a foundation or cornerstone deposit, according to International Time Capsule Society founders William E. Jarvis and Knute Berger. Burying ceremonial artifacts in building foundations has a long and noble history, dating back to holy relics placed within the floors and walls of medieval cathedrals.

Revere’s and Adams’ foundation deposit box was rediscovered twice. First, in 1855, workers adding on to the state house unearthed the box. Someone added new items before resealing the brass box in plaster and replacing it. In December 2014, workers fixing a water leak found it again. Curators from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston carefully opened the container to reveal 17th-century coins, an intact newspaper (an 1855 edition), a medal bearing George Washington’s likeness and a silver plaque engraved by Revere. You can view videos of the contents at the museum website.

Six months later, conservators transferred the contents to a stainless steel container, added a 2015 mint coin set and a new plaque, and filled the box with argon gas. It’s again inside the building’s foundation, awaiting its next rediscovery.

2. The Safe Side: 1876–1976

By Jarvis’ definition, the earliest “official” American time capsule was the Century Safe, exhibited at the 1876 Philadelphia World’s Fair. A woman named Anna Diehm, publisher of the Our Second Century weekly, had the idea and assembled the contents in a fireproof cabinet. President Ulysses S. Grant observed the ceremonial closing. The case was stored at the US Capitol, designated for opening at the nation’s bicentennial in 1976.

President Gerald Ford and Congressional leaders witnessed the Century Safe opening. Out came a scroll signed by members of the 44th Congress, an album with autographs of other prominent men, a gold pen from poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and photos by photographer Matthew Brady. Diehm’s concept of a preservation safe led the way for future vaults and a time capsule craze that swept the nation.

3. Near Miss: 1894–2015

Astronomer and optical instrument maker John Brashear’s 1894 foundation deposit was nearly destroyed a few years ago during the demolition of the building that once housed his business in Pittsburgh’s Observatory Hill district.

Brashear had placed a small metal box in the cornerstone of the Astronomical & Physical Instrument Works on Aug. 14, 1894. In 2015, conservators at the city’s Heinz History Center unpacked and cataloged pictures of Brashear, his wife, Phoebe (labeled “my dear girl”), his employees and his equipment a lock of Phoebe’s hair business correspondence and a small piece of glass labeled “One of the first pieces of optical glass made in America. May we hope that when this stone is opened America will lead the world.” The contents are personal you get the impression that Brashear carefully selected each item. Although the box doesn’t specify an opening date, Brashear, like Revere, clearly intended the box to be opened at some future point.

Brashear’s time capsule is now at the Heinz History Center. You can read about it and see photos of the contents on the center’s blog.

4. Touching Base: 1913–2017

After the New Orleans city government removed a statue of Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard in 2017, workers found a time capsule beneath the pedestal. The badly oxidized copper box had been placed Nov. 14, 1913, during a dedication ceremony. The contents were waterlogged, some damaged beyond recognition.

A list of the relics was read aloud at the 1913 ceremony, and the New Orleans Times Democrat described them the next day. They included:

  • the ceremony invitation and program
  • Beauregard Monument Association charter and member list
  • the Confederate States seal
  • the four Confederate flags and a US flag
  • photos of Confederate monuments to Gen. Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis and others
  • badges of Confederate organizations
  • several newspapers
  • Confederate and Louisiana currency
  • a city guide to New Orleans
  • Chaudron’s spelling book from 1865

Many time capsules are lost over time, according to the Oglethorpe University Time Capsule Association. Theft and secret locations that die with the owner are sometimes responsible. But containers and placements vulnerable to the elements also account for damaged contents. The contents of the Beauregard time capsule were subject to changes in temperature and humidity, and the effect of interaction among items inside. After conservation, the items may go on display at the Louisiana State Museum.

5. About Scouts: 1961–2010

The Boy Scouts of Troop 11 in Wiesbaden, Germany, assembled a time capsule to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Scouting in 1961. German and American troop members contributed photos, film, newspapers, scouting books, and letters from US government leaders. It was to be opened on the 100th birthday of the Boy Scouts in 2010. The container was placed at the US Military’s General von Steuben Hotel in Wiesbaden. (The hotel famously played host to President John F. Kennedy on his way to Berlin in 1963.)

Today the hotel is called the Dorint Pallas Wiesbaden, and its conscientious engineering department kept track of the capsule’s whereabouts and the countdown to opening day. On May 8, 2010, scouts who created the time capsule were among those present to open it, along with current scouts and the mayor of Wiesbaden.

6. Scrunchies and Cookies: 1987–2012

A time capsule doesn’t have to be filled with historically significant artifacts. Personal objects of everyday life capture personalities and a point in time—fascinating for anyone interested in social and cultural history. Case in point: In 1987, Girl Scout Troop 272 of Brea, Calif., buried a memory-filled steel box. Members marked the location with a bronze plaque engraved with the reopening date, the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouting.

The scouts gathered 25 years later to open the treasury of 1980s life: a “Happy 100th” birthday balloon, teen fan magazines, campfire ashes, hair scrunchies, a scrapbook about then-current events, and a green Thin Mints box (empty, of course—who could wait 25 years to eat them?).

7. Car Wreck: 1957–2007

In 1957, Tulsa, Okla., residents were looking for a memorable state jubilee project that would truly set their city apart. They settled on a time capsule to be buried in a Plymouth Belvedere two-door sedan and scheduled for disinterment after 50 years. A contest had locals predict the city’s 2007 population the lucky heir of the person who came closest would win the car and a $100 savings bond.

The car was sprayed with a preservative, wrapped in plastic and set in a concrete vault. Road trip supplies filled the trunk: gasoline, oil and beer. The glove compartment held hairpins, a makeup compact, plastic rain cap, comb, chewing gum, cigarettes, a bottle of tranquilizers, $2.73 in cash and unpaid parking tickets.

Unfortunately, the vehicle wasn’t quite in driving condition. The burial location in downtown Tulsa had caused some worry about road vibrations that might crack the concrete vault. Those fears were realized when the car was found sitting in four feet of water in 2007. The unveiling at the city convention center revealed a sea of mud and rust that had damaged the artifacts inside, although the chrome still shone brightly when the front bumper was cleaned.

A metal time capsule cylinder welded to the car’s roof fared better, with its contents in near-perfect condition: a US flag, letters from city officials, and the contest guesses. Raymond E. Humbertson’s prediction of 384,743, was closest to the Census Bureau’s stat of 382,457. He had passed away, so his sister received the car. After a superhuman rust removal effort, it was sent to an auto museum in Roscoe, Ill.


220-year-old time capsule opened in Boston

The oldest time capsule ever discovered in America, which dates back to 1795, was opened Tuesday in Boston.

The time capsule was removed from the Massachusetts State House cornerstone Dec. 11 of last year, along with miscellaneous coins. Museum and state officials removed its contents for the first time since 1855, when its contents were documented and cleaned, officials said.

The relic had originally been placed under a cornerstone of the Boston Statehouse in 1795 by American Revolution patriot Paul Revere and then-Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams.

Additional materials were added then to the time capsule in 1855, which was placed in brass, and plastered into the underside of the granite cornerstone.

The capsule was opened Tuesday evening at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, allowing only credentialed media because of "extremely limited space and object sensitivity."

Pamela Hatchfield, head of objects conservation at the museum, first removed the lid after having loosened the screws beforehand for about four to five hours, she said. Inside the capsule, Hatchfield removed folded newspapers and minted coins.

Another item removed. Assorted morning papers of the day?These appear to be 19th century. pic.twitter.com/1HzWgTq28j

&mdash Ben Edwards (@BostonHistory) January 6, 2015

"This is clearly a newspaper and it's really packed in there," Hatchfield said, wearing gloves and a white coat and using tools including a porcupine quill and a dentist's probe.

Hatchfield also found 24 coins in various denominations, all dating from the 1650s to the 1850s, when the capsule was opened then resealed. The folded newspapers appeared to be in very good condition but it was not possible to tell the dates or what news was being reported.

Because museum experts must use extreme caution in preserving the artifacts, more details are expected as Hatchfield and her team continue to exhume the capsule's contents.

Though, according to X-rays taken at the MFA in December, the capsule appears to contain even more artifacts.

"X-rays revealed what is believed to be a collection of silver and copper coins (dating from 1652 and 1855) an engraved silver plate a copper medal depicting George Washington newspapers the seal of the Commonwealth cards and a title page from the Massachusetts Colony Records," the MFA said in a statement last month. "These objects were described in the 1855 account of the reburying ceremony."


Watch the video: Legends and Lies The Patriots S02E01 400p 242mb hdtv x264 Sam Adams u0026 Paul Revere The Rebellion Beg (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Chimalli

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  2. Zulkizilkree

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  3. Dor

    The authoritative message :)

  4. Bajinn

    I can't take part in the discussion right now - I'm very busy. I will be released - I will definitely express my opinion on this issue.

  5. Praza

    That does not concern you!



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